Article

Interaction of vesicular arbuscular mycorrhiza with root knot nematodes in tomato

University of Agricultural Sciences Department of Agricultural Microbiology and Plant Pathology 560 065 Bangalore India
Plant and Soil (Impact Factor: 3.24). 01/1979; 51(3):397-403. DOI: 10.1007/BF02197786

ABSTRACT The interaction between the VA mycorrhizal fungus,Glomus fasciculatus and the root-knot nematodes,Meloidogyne incognita andM. javanica, and their effects on the growth and phosphorus nutrition of tomato was studied in a red sandy loam soil of pH 6.0. Inoculation of tomato roots with root-knot nematodes enhanced infection and spore production byG. fasciculatus. Inoculation of tomato plants withG. fasciculatus significantly reduced the number and size of the root-knot galls produced byM. incognita andM. javanica. Inoculation withG. fasciculatus although improved plant growth and its total phosphorus content compared to the uninoculated plants, the difference were not statistically significant.

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