Article

The two facets of female violence: The public and the domestic domains

Israeli Prison Service; Bar-Ilan University
Journal of Family Violence (Impact Factor: 1.17). 11/1993; 8(4):345-359. DOI: 10.1007/BF00978098

ABSTRACT Violent behavior of women varies significantly in the public and private domains. Criminal statistics indicate a relatively low proportion of women among violent offenders in the public domain, while in the domestic and/or private domain statistics reflect almost no gender difference in violent behavior. The following paper proposes a dynamic model which draws upon psychological and sociological variables and suggests that the clue for understanding the paradoxical phenomenon lies in the relative importance the domestic domain plays in the woman''s value structure. Among the variables considered were: social learning patterns regarding violent behavior; perception of danger; and the ways in which women express their frustration and/or anger.

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