Article

Elimination of the associated microbial community and bioencapsulation of bacteria in the rotifer Brachionus plicatilis

Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas del Noroeste
Aquaculture International (Impact Factor: 0.96). 12/2002; 11(1):95-108. DOI: 10.1023/A:1024117109362

ABSTRACT The bioencapsulation of live bacteria in the rotifer Brachionus plicatilis was determined under monoxenic conditions. The first objective was to evaluate the microbiota of the rotifer during intensive production and to obtain sterile rotifer cultures starting from adult females or amictic eggs using PVP-Iodine, Hydrogen peroxide or antibiotic mixtures. In the rotifers, the proportion of vibrios increased significantly during the mass production, displacing other unidentified marine bacteria. Rotifers, in the absence of culturable bacteria were obtained starting from amictic eggs and using Trimetroprim-sulfametoxasole (Bactrim Roche) at 10 ml l–1. The effect of members of Vibrionaceae on the survival and growth rate of rotifers was determined under monoxenic conditions. The survival of rotifers was not affected in the presence of different isolates, while amictic egg formation occurred and the populations increased when the strains Vibrio proteolyticus C279 and Aeromonas media C226 were tested. All isolates were successfully incorporated in the rotifers, since there was no significant difference between the numbers of bioencapsulated cells of different strains of isolates. The results show that it is possible to replace the microbial community in rotifer cultures, started from disinfected amictic eggs, with selected bacterial strains. This could be used as a tool for future studies to reveal the role of specific bacteria on first larval stages of marine fish species.

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Available from: Carlos Alfonso Alvarez-González, Jun 29, 2015
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