Article

Quantifying, Understanding and Managing the Carbon Cycle in the Next Decades

Climatic Change (Impact Factor: 4.62). 12/2004; 67(2):147-160. DOI: 10.1007/s10584-004-3765-y
Source: OAI

ABSTRACT The human perturbation of the carbon cycle via the release of fossil CO2 and land use change is now well documented and agreed to be the principal cause of climate change. We address three fundamental research areas that require major development if we were to provide policy relevant knowledge for managing the carbon-climate system over the next few decades. The three research areas are: (i) carbon observations and multiple constraint data assimilation; (ii) vulnerability of the carbon-climate system; and (iii) carbon sequestration and sustainable development.

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