Article

Microsatellite DNA somaclonal variation in micropropagated trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides). Plant Cel Rep

Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2P5
Plant Cell Reports (Impact Factor: 2.94). 08/2001; 20(6):531-536. DOI: 10.1007/s002990100365

ABSTRACT Microsatellite DNA markers of ten simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci were used to examine somaclonal variation in randomly selected micropropagated plantlets derived from three different Populus tremuloides donor trees (genotypes). The plantlets were obtained from tissue cultures of dormant vegetative buds, and those derived from the same donor tree, grown in the greenhouse, did not exhibit any sign of visible morphological variation. No microsatellite DNA variation was observed among 13 somaclones of one tree and 4 somaclones of another tree at eight of the ten SSR loci. However, despite the small number of micropropagated progeny per tree sampled, microsatellite DNA variation was detected among the plantlets derived from the same donor trees at two SSR loci. The primer pair for the SSR locus PTR5 revealed somaclonal variation in 1 out of the 13 plantlets obtained from one genotype, while the primer pair for the PTR2 SSR locus revealed somaclonal variation in one out of the four plantlets obtained from another genotype. The variation at the PTR2 locus resulted in the appearance of a new allele of increased size, possibly due to an addition of the repeat units, while the variation at the PTR5 locus resulted in the appearance of third allele, presumably due to the presence of a single extra chromosome or duplication of a chromosomal segment. These results demonstrate that the genetic fidelity of micropropagated plants of P. tremuloides cannot always be assured and somaclonal variation can occur even when tissues of well organized vegetative buds are used for tissue cultures; that somaclonal variation cannot always be detected at the gross morphological level; and that microsatellite DNA markers provide useful and sensitive markers for determining the clonal fidelity and somaclonal variation in P. tremuloides.

0 Followers
 · 
221 Views
  • Source
    • "Alternatively, this difficulty can be overcome using in vitro micrografting techniques (Silva et al., 2005). Other challenge is the generating planting material with genetic stability in order to maintain interest traits of superior genotypes (Rahman and Rajora, 2001). The somaclonal variations are genetic and epigenetic changes that occur uncontrollable, spontaneous and randomly during the in vitro process. "
  • Source
    • "Alternatively, this difficulty can be overcome using in vitro micrografting techniques (Silva et al., 2005). Other challenge is the generating planting material with genetic stability in order to maintain interest traits of superior genotypes (Rahman and Rajora, 2001). The somaclonal variations are genetic and epigenetic changes that occur uncontrollable, spontaneous and randomly during the in vitro process. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The major inconsisten regeneratio this study, regeneratio program we and G3 gen explants w micrograftin genetic sta cytometry reported fo tetraploid a other geno preserves t TA Citros Sylv limitation i nt and unsta on system is , the intera on shoots fro ere evaluate notypes, res were collecte ng technique bility of micr and DNA p or the first t and 5% of p otypes. Thus the clonal fid
    AFRICAN JOURNAL OF BIOTECHNOLOGY 09/2014; 13(38):3871-3880. DOI:10.5897/AJB14.13649 · 0.57 Impact Factor
  • Source
    • "during somatic embryogenesis of in vitro culture of several gymnosperms, such as P. abies (Mo et al. 1989; Fourre et al. 1997; Harvengt et al. 2001; Helmersson et al. 2004), P. glauca and P. mariana (Eastman et al. 1991; Tremblay et al. 1999), P. pinaster (Marum et al. 2009), and a number of angiosperm woody plants, such as English oak (Hornero et al. 2001), cork oak (Gallego et al. 1997), Populus deltoides and P. tremuloides (Rahman and Pajora 2001). It is assumed that the cells with changes in the chromosome number and/or DNA rearrangements observed during callogenesis were eliminated during long culture periods and following formation of somatic embryos as these were identical to the original explants (Helmesson et al. 2004; Klimaszewskia et al. 2009). "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to obtain a genetically stable haploid in vitro-derived line from Siberian larch (Larix sibirica Ledeb.) using megagametophyte explants, which then could be used for different molecular genetic studies, including whole genome de novo sequencing. However, cytogenetic analysis and genotyping of 11 microsatellite loci showed high levels of genomic instability and a high frequency of mutation in the obtained megagametophyte-derived callus cultures. All cultures contained new mutations in one or more microsatellite loci.
    In Vitro Cellular & Developmental Biology - Plant 06/2014; 50(5):655-664. DOI:10.1007/s11627-014-9619-z · 1.16 Impact Factor
Show more