Article

Effects of clonidine, prazosin and phentolamine on heart rate and coronary sinus catecholamine concentration during cardioaccelerator nerve stimulation in spinal dogs.

British Journal of Pharmacology (Impact Factor: 4.99). 11/1979; 67(2):283-92. DOI: 10.1111/j.1476-5381.1979.tb08678.x
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT 1 In spinal dogs, continuous electrical stimulation of the cardioaccelerator nerve produced a transient rise in aortic blood pressure and a sustained increase in both heart rate and coronary sinus blood flow. The latter effects were accompanied by a significant elevation in the coronary sinus plasma noradrenaline concentration without significant changes in the levels of dopamine and adrenaline. The concentrations of the three catecholamines in thoracic aorta plasma were not significantly changed by cardioaccelerator nerve stimulation.2 Clonidine (20 mug/kg, i.v.), given during cardioaccelerator nerve stimulation, increased both mean aortic blood pressure and coronary sinus blood flow and decreased heart rate and coronary sinus venous plasma noradrenaline overflow.3 Phentolamine (0.3 mg/kg, i.v.) completely antagonized these effects of clonidine. Prazosin (0.3 mg/kg, i.v.) inhibited by only 43 and 38% the respective reductions in heart rate and noradrenaline overflow elicited by clonidine.4 On termination of cardioaccelerator stimulation (about 10 min after either prazosin or phentolamine), heart rate and coronary sinus noradrenaline overflow returned to control prestimulation levels.5 Phentolamine or prazosin, administered alone during stimulation of the cardioaccelerator nerve, increased heart rate and noradrenaline overflow into the coronary sinus plasma. However, intravenous phentolamine and prazosin, in contrast to desipramine (0.3 mg/kg, i.v.) or tyramine (1.0 mg, i.a.), failed to change the tachycardia resulting from the local administration of noradrenaline into the sinus node artery (i.a.).6 These results show that in spinal dogs the clonidine-induced reduction in heart rate (elevated by electrical stimulation of the cardioaccelerator nerve) is accompanied by a fall in the quantity of noradrenaline overflowing into the coronary sinus plasma. The latter effect is presumably the result of an action of clonidine on cardiac presynaptic alpha-adrenoceptors, the activation of which is followed by a reduction in the release of noradrenaline per nerve impulse. Phentolamine and prazosin are both antagonists of cardiac presynaptic alpha-adrenoceptors in spinal dogs, as suggested by their action against clonidine and by their positive chronotropic effect when administered during stimulation of the cardioaccelerator nerve.

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