Article

Pain complaints in patients with fibromyalgia versus chronic fatigue syndrome

Current Pain and Headache Reports (Impact Factor: 1.67). 04/2012; 4(2):148-157. DOI: 10.1007/s11916-000-0050-2

ABSTRACT Individuals with fibromyalgia (FM) and/or chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) report arthralgias and myalgias. However, only persons
with FM alone exhibit abnormal pain responses to mild levels of stimulation, or allodynia. We identify the abnormalities in
the neuroendocrine axes that are common to FM and CFS as well as the abnormalities in central neuropeptide levels and functional
brain activity that differentiate these disorders. These two sets of factors, respectively, may account for the similiarities
and differences in the pain experiences of persons with FM and CFS.

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