Article

LG839: Anti-obesity effects and polymorphic gene correlates of reward deficiency syndrome

Weill Cornell Medical College Department of Neurosurgery New York New York USA
Advances in Therapy (Impact Factor: 2.44). 09/2008; 25(9):894-913. DOI: 10.1007/s12325-008-0093-z
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT IntroductionThis study systematically assessed the weight management effects of a novel experimental DNA-customized nutraceutical, LG839
(LifeGen®, Inc., La Jolla, CA, USA).

MethodsA total of 1058 subjects who participated in the overall D.I.E.T. study were genotyped and administered an LG839 variant based
on polymorphic outcomes. A subset of 27 self-identified obese subjects of Dutch descent, having the same DNA pattern of four
out of the five candidate genes tested (chi-square analysis) as the entire data set, was subsequently evaluated. Simple t tests comparing a number of weight management parameters before and after 80 days of treatment with LG839 were performed.

ResultsSignificant results were observed for weight loss, sugar craving reduction, appetite suppression, snack reduction, reduction
of late night eating (all P<0.01), increased perception of overeating, enhanced quality of sleep, increased happiness (all P<0.05), and increased energy (P<0.001). Polymorphic correlates were obtained for a number of genes (LEP, PPAR-γ2, MTHFR, 5-HT2A, and DRD2 genes) with positive clinical parameters tested in this study. Of all the outcomes and gene polymorphisms, only the DRD2
gene polymorphism (A1 allele) had a significant Pearson correlation with days on treatment (r=0.42, P=0.045).

ConclusionIf these results are confirmed in additional rigorous, controlled studies, we carefully suggest that DNA-directed targeting
of certain regulator genes, along with customized nutraceutical intervention, provides a unique framework and strategic modality
to combat obesity.

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