Chapter

A Numerical Model for Re-radiated Noise in Buildings from Underground Railways

DOI: 10.1007/978-3-540-74893-9_16

ABSTRACT A numerical prediction model is developed to quantify vibrations and re-radiated noise due to underground railways. A coupled
FE-BE model is used to compute the incident ground vibrations due to the passage of a train in the tunnel. This source model
accounts for three-dimensional dynamic interaction between the track, tunnel and soil. The incident wave field is used to
solve the dynamic soil-structure interaction problem on the receiver side and to determine the vibration levels along the
essential structural elements of the building. The soil-structure interaction problem is solved by means of a 3D boundary
element method for the soil coupled to a 3D finite element method for the structural part. An acoustic 3D spectral finite
element method is used to predict the acoustic response. The Bakerloo line tunnel of London Underground has been modelled
using the coupled periodic FE-BE approach. The free-field response and the re-radiated noise in a portal frame office building
is predicted.

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    ABSTRACT: This paper reports on the results of in situ vibration measurements that have been performed within the frame of the CONVURT project at a site in Regent's Park on the Bakerloo line of London Underground during 35 passages of a test train at a speed between 20 and 50 km/h. Vibration measurements have been performed on the axle boxes of the test train, on the rails, on the tunnel invert and tunnel wall, and in the free field, both at the surface and at a depth of 15 m. Measurements have also been made on floors and columns of two buildings in a row of Regency houses at a distance of 70 m from the tunnel. Prior to these vibration measurements, the dynamic soil characteristics have been determined by in situ and laboratory testing. Rail and wheel roughness have been measured and the track characteristics have been determined by rail receptance and wave decay measurements. Time histories and one-third octave band RMS spectra of the measured velocities are discussed and the variation of the peak particle velocity and the frequency content as a function of the train speed and the distance to the tunnel are elaborated.
    Journal of Sound and Vibration 01/2006; · 1.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A numerical model is presented to predict vibrations in the free field from excitation due to metro trains in tunnels. The three-dimensional dynamic tunnel–soil interaction problem is solved with a subdomain formulation, using a finite element formulation for the tunnel and a boundary element method for the soil. The periodicity of the geometry in the longitudinal direction of the tunnel is exploited using the Floquet transform, limiting the discretization to a single-bounded reference cell. The responses of two different types of tunnel due to a harmonic load on the tunnel invert are compared, both in the frequency–wavenumber and spatial domains. The first tunnel is a shallow cut-and-cover masonry tunnel on the Paris metro network, embedded in layers of sand, while the second tunnel is a deep bored tunnel of London Underground, with a cast iron lining and embedded in the London clay.
    Journal of Sound and Vibration 01/2006; · 1.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This paper presents the experimental validation of a numerical model for the prediction of subway induced vibrations. The model fully accounts for the dynamic interaction between the train, the track, the tunnel and the soil. The periodicity or invariance of the tunnel and the soil in the longitudinal direction is exploited using the Floquet transformation, which allows for an efficient formulation in the frequency-wavenumber domain. A general analytical formulation is used to compute the response of three-dimensional invariant or periodic media that are excited by moving loads. The numerical model is validated by means of several experiments that have been performed at a site in Regent’s Park on the Bakerloo line of London Underground. Vibration measurements have been performed on the axle boxes of the train, on the rail, the tunnel invert and the tunnel wall, and in the free field, both at the surface and at a depth of 15 m. Prior to these vibration measurements, the dynamic soil characteristics and the track characteristics have been determined. The Bakerloo line tunnel of London Underground has been modelled using the coupled periodic FE-BE approach and free field vibrations due to the passage of a train have been predicted and compared to the measurements. The correspondence between the predicted and measured response in the tunnel and in the free field is reasonably good, given the large amount of uncertainties involved.
    Journal of Sound and Vibration 04/2009; 321(s 3–5). · 1.61 Impact Factor

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