Article

Racial/ethnic disparities in HIV diagnoses among persons aged 50 years and older in 37 US States, 2005-2008.

Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, National Center for HIV, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Atlanta, GA 30333, USA.
American Journal of Public Health (Impact Factor: 3.93). 06/2012; 102(8):1527-34. DOI: 10.2105/AJPH.2011.300431
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT We examined racial/ethnic disparities in HIV diagnosis rates for persons aged 50 years and older.
We analyzed surveillance data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention regarding HIV diagnoses during 2005 through 2008 in 37 states. Average annual rates of diagnoses were calculated for persons aged 50 years and older and compared with rates for persons aged 13 to 49 years.
The average annual rate of diagnosis (per 100,000 persons) for older persons was 9.8. Rates among older Blacks (49.2) and Hispanics/Latinos (19.5) were 12.6 and 5.0 times, respectively, the rate among older Whites (3.9); rates among younger Blacks (102.5) and Hispanics/Latinos (39.0) were 7.7 and 2.9 times, respectively, the rate among younger Whites (13.3). Older persons were more likely than younger persons to receive a late HIV diagnosis (prevalence ratio=1.5, P<.001).
Racial/ethnic disparities in HIV diagnosis rates are greater among persons aged 50 years and older than among younger persons. The greater HIV diagnosis rates in Blacks and later diagnosis among older persons of all races/ethnicities indicate a need to increase their awareness of risk factors for HIV infection.

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