Article

Chemiluminescence detection with separation techniques for bioanalytical applications

Bioanalytical Reviews 1(1):25-34. DOI: 10.1007/s12566-009-0002-1

ABSTRACT Chemiluminescence detection is known to be a sensitive, selective, and versatile method that can be used in combination with
separation techniques such as high-performance liquid chromatography, capillary electrophoresis, and chip electrophoresis.
This article reviews the bioanalytical applications of a combination of chemiluminescence detection and separation techniques
published in the literature between 1999 and 2008. Luminol chemiluminescene, peroxyoxalate chemiluminescence, and electrochemiluminescence
have been mainly used for bioanalytical application. In this paper, only the applications of the method for the analysis of
biosamples, serum, plasma, urine, and tissue samples are discussed.

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