Change in alcohol outlet density and alcohol-related harm to population health (CHALICE)

Institute of Primary Care & Public Health, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Heath Park, Cardiff CF14 4YS, UK.
BMC Public Health (Impact Factor: 2.26). 06/2012; 12(1):428. DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-12-428
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Excess alcohol consumption has serious adverse effects on health and violence-related harm. In the UK around 37% of men and 29% of women drink to excess and 20% and 13% report binge drinking. The potential impact on population health from a reduction in consumption is considerable. One proposed method to reduce consumption is to reduce availability through controls on alcohol outlet density. In this study we investigate the impact of a change in the density of alcohol outlets on alcohol consumption and alcohol-related harms to health in the community.
A natural experiment of the effect of change in outlet density between 2005-09, in Wales, UK; population 2.4 million aged 16 years and over. Data on outlets are held by the 22 local authorities in Wales under The Licensing Act 2003. The study outcomes are change in (1) alcohol consumption using data from annual Welsh Health Surveys, (2) alcohol-related hospital admissions using the Patient Episode Database for Wales, (3) Accident & Emergency department attendances between midnight-6am, and (4) alcohol-related violent crime against the person, using Police data. The data will be anonymously record-linked within the Secure Anonymised Information Linkage Databank at individual and 2001 Census Lower Super Output Area levels. New methods of network analysis will be used to estimate outlet density. Longitudinal statistical analysis will use (1) multilevel ordinal models of consumption and logistic models of admissions and Accident & Emergency attendance as a function of change in individual outlet exposure, adjusting for confounding variables, and (2) spatial models of the change in counts/rates of each outcome measure and outlet density. We will assess the impact on health inequalities and will correct for population migration.
This inter-disciplinary study requires expertise in epidemiology and public health, health informatics, medical statistics, geographical information science, and research into alcohol-related violence. Information governance requirements for the use of record-linked data have been approved together with formal data access agreements for the use of the Welsh Health Survey and Police data. The dissemination strategy will include policy makers in national and local government. Public engagement will be through the Clinical Research Collaboration-Cymru "Involving People" network, which will provide input into the implementation of the research.

Download full-text


Available from: Iain R Brennan, Sep 29, 2015
74 Reads
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to investigate residential exposure to alcohol outlets in relation to alcohol consumption and mental health morbidity (anxiety, stress, and depression). This was a cross-sectional study of 6,837 adults obtained from a population representative sample for the period 2006-2009 in Perth, Western Australia. The number of alcohol outlets was ascertained for a 1600 m service area surrounding the residential address. Zero-inflated negative binomial and logistic regression were used to assess associations with total alcohol consumption, harmful alcohol consumption (7-10 drinks containing 10 g of alcohol for men, 5-6 drinks for women) and medically diagnosed and hospital contacts (for anxiety, stress, and depression), respectively. The rate ratio for the number of days of harmful consumption of alcohol per month and the number of standard drinks of alcohol consumed per drinking day was 1.06 (95% CI: 1.02, 1.11) and 1.01 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.03) for each additional liquor store within a 1600 m service area, respectively. The odds ratio of hospital contact for anxiety, stress, or depression was 1.56 (95% CI: 0.98, 2.49) for those with a liquor store within the service area compared to those without. We observed strong evidence for a small association between residential exposure to liquor stores and harmful consumption of alcohol, and some support for a moderate-sized effect on hospital contacts for anxiety, stress, and depression.
    PLoS ONE 01/2013; 8(1):e53461. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0053461 · 3.23 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The influence of neighbourhood deprivation on the risk of harmful alcohol consumption, measured by the separate categories of excess consumption and binge drinking, has not been studied. The study objective was to investigate the effect of neighbourhood deprivation with age, gender and socioeconomic status (SES) on (1) excess alcohol consumption and (2) binge drinking, in a representative population survey. Cross-sectional study: multilevel analysis. Wales, UK, adult population ∼2.2 million. 58 282 respondents aged 18 years and over to four successive annual Welsh Health Surveys (2003/2004-2007), nested within 32 692 households, 1839 census lower super output areas and the 22 unitary authority areas in Wales. Maximal daily alcohol consumption during the past week was categorised using the UK Department of Health definition of 'none/never drinks', 'within guidelines', 'excess consumption but less than binge' and 'binge'. The data were analysed using continuation ratio ordinal multilevel models with multiple imputation for missing covariates. Respondents in the most deprived neighbourhoods were more likely to binge drink than in the least deprived (adjusted estimates: 17.5% vs 10.6%; difference=6.9%, 95% CI 6.0 to 7.8), but were less likely to report excess consumption (17.6% vs 21.3%; difference=3.7%, 95% CI 2.6 to 4.8). The effect of deprivation varied significantly with age and gender, but not with SES. Younger men in deprived neighbourhoods were most likely to binge drink. Men aged 35-64 showed the steepest increase in binge drinking in deprived neighbourhoods, but men aged 18-24 showed a smaller increase with deprivation. This large-scale population study is the first to show that neighbourhood deprivation acts differentially on the risk of binge drinking between men and women at different age groups. Understanding the socioeconomic patterns of harmful alcohol consumption is important for public health policy development.
    BMJ Open 04/2013; 3(4). DOI:10.1136/bmjopen-2012-002337 · 2.27 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Alcohol-related harm is related to alcohol availability. Due to complex regulatory and environmental factors, alcohol availability varies spatially. However, the extent of this variation is largely unknown in the UK, despite its potential influence on patterns of alcohol-related harm. We investigate why administrative data is underused in the study of alcohol-related harm in the UK. We found that local authorities routinely collect a rich supply of licensing data. However, this information is stored in databases that are sometimes difficult to access. With greater coordination between researchers and practitioners, this data can be used to fulfil its primary administrative purpose and also contribute to understanding and prevention of alcohol-related health and social problems.
    Health & Place 08/2013; 24C:110-114. DOI:10.1016/j.healthplace.2013.07.006 · 2.81 Impact Factor
Show more