Article

Elastic volume reconstruction from series of ultra-thin microscopy sections.

Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Dresden, Germany.
Nature Methods (Impact Factor: 25.95). 06/2012; 9(7):717-20. DOI: 10.1038/nmeth.2072
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Anatomy of large biological specimens is often reconstructed from serially sectioned volumes imaged by high-resolution microscopy. We developed a method to reassemble a continuous volume from such large section series that explicitly minimizes artificial deformation by applying a global elastic constraint. We demonstrate our method on a series of transmission electron microscopy sections covering the entire 558-cell Caenorhabditis elegans embryo and a segment of the Drosophila melanogaster larval ventral nerve cord.

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