Article

BIPS: BIANA Interolog Prediction Server. A tool for protein-protein interaction inference.

Structural Bioinformatics Laboratory (GRIB-IMIM), Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona Research Park of Biomedicine (PRBB), 08003 Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
Nucleic Acids Research (Impact Factor: 8.81). 06/2012; 40(Web Server issue):W147-51. DOI: 10.1093/nar/gks553
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) play a crucial role in biology, and high-throughput experiments have greatly increased the coverage of known interactions. Still, identification of complete inter- and intraspecies interactomes is far from being complete. Experimental data can be complemented by the prediction of PPIs within an organism or between two organisms based on the known interactions of the orthologous genes of other organisms (interologs). Here, we present the BIANA (Biologic Interactions and Network Analysis) Interolog Prediction Server (BIPS), which offers a web-based interface to facilitate PPI predictions based on interolog information. BIPS benefits from the capabilities of the framework BIANA to integrate the several PPI-related databases. Additional metadata can be used to improve the reliability of the predicted interactions. Sensitivity and specificity of the server have been calculated using known PPIs from different interactomes using a leave-one-out approach. The specificity is between 72 and 98%, whereas sensitivity varies between 1 and 59%, depending on the sequence identity cut-off used to calculate similarities between sequences. BIPS is freely accessible at http://sbi.imim.es/BIPS.php.

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