Article

RNA-binding proteins in neurological disease.

Department of Neurology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, 01605, USA.
Brain research (Impact Factor: 2.46). 06/2012; 1462:1-2. DOI: 10.1016/j.brainres.2012.05.038
Source: PubMed
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