Article

F-18-labelled CCR1-receptor antagonist is not suitable for imaging of Alzheimer's disease

Dr. Bettina Beuthien-Baumann, MD, Klinik und Poliklinik für Nuklearmedizin, Universitätsklinikum Carl Gustav Carus, Fetscherstraße 74, 01307 Dresden, Germany, E-mail: .
Nuklearmedizin (Impact Factor: 1.67). 06/2012; 51(5). DOI: 10.3413/Nukmed-0457-12-01
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) with positron emission tomography (PET) using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) relies on typical alterations of brain glucose metabolism which are, however, not disease specific. Amyloid-β imaging has not entered clinical routine yet. Post mortem histological specimen of brain tissue from AD patients revealed enhanced expression of the chemotactic cytocine receptor 1 (CCR1). Participants, methods: CCR1-antagonist ZK811460 was labeled with fluorine-18 to explore its possible use as specific diagnostic tool in AD. Tracer characterization comprising PET imaging of brain and metabolite analysis was performed in AD patients and controls. Results: Neither qualitative evaluation nor quantitative compartment analysis of PET data did show any enhanced binding of the 18F-labeled CCR1-antagonist in the brain of AD patients or controls. Conclusion: 18F-ZK811460 did not fulfill the expectation as diagnostic tracer in PET imaging of AD.

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