Article

An Ecological Alternative to Snodgrass & Vanderwart: 360 High Quality Colour Images with Norms for Seven Psycholinguistic Variables

Departamento de Psicología Básica I, Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia, Madrid, Spain.
PLoS ONE (Impact Factor: 3.53). 05/2012; 7(5):e37527. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0037527
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT This work presents a new set of 360 high quality colour images belonging to 23 semantic subcategories. Two hundred and thirty-six Spanish speakers named the items and also provided data from seven relevant psycholinguistic variables: age of acquisition, familiarity, manipulability, name agreement, typicality and visual complexity. Furthermore, we also present lexical frequency data derived from Internet search hits. Apart from the high number of variables evaluated, knowing that it affects the processing of stimuli, this new set presents important advantages over other similar image corpi: (a) this corpus presents a broad number of subcategories and images; for example, this will permit researchers to select stimuli of appropriate difficulty as required, (e.g., to deal with problems derived from ceiling effects); (b) the fact of using coloured stimuli provides a more realistic, ecologically-valid, representation of real life objects. In sum, this set of stimuli provides a useful tool for research on visual object- and word-processing, both in neurological patients and in healthy controls.

Download full-text

Full-text

Available from: Pedro R. Montoro, Jul 28, 2015
0 Followers
 · 
166 Views
  • Source
    • "We selected 18 colored photographs of daily-life objects from two standardized stimulus sets (Brodeur, Dionne-Dostie, Montreuil, Lepage, & Op de Beeck, 2010; Moreno-Martínez & Montoro, 2012). Half of the objects were kitchen utensils whereas the other half were garage tools. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The purpose of the current study was to investigate to what extent low-level versus high-level effects determine where the eyes land on isolated daily-life objects. We operationalized low-level effects as eye movements toward an object's center of gravity (CoG) or the absolute object center (OC) and high-level effects as visuomotor priming by object affordances. In two experiments, we asked participants to make saccades toward peripherally presented photographs of graspable objects (e.g., a hammer) and to either categorize them (Experiment 1) or to discriminate them from visually matched nonobjects (Experiment 2). Objects were rotated such that their graspable part (e.g., the hammer's handle) pointed toward either the left or the right whereas their action-performing part (e.g., the hammer's head) pointed toward the other side. We found that early-triggered saccades were neither biased toward the object's graspable part nor toward its action-performing part. Instead, participants' eyes landed near the CoG/OC. Only longer-latency initial saccades and refixations were subject to high-level influences, being significantly biased toward the object's action-performing part. Our comparison with eye movements toward visually matched nonobjects revealed that the latter was not merely the consequence of a low-level effect of shape, texture, asymmetry, or saliency. Instead, we interpret it as a higher-level, object-based affordance effect that requires time, and to some extent also foveation, in order to build up and to overcome default saccadic-programming mechanisms.
    Journal of Vision 04/2015; 15(5):8. DOI:10.1167/15.5.8 · 2.73 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We report object-naming and object recognition times collected from Russian native speakers for the colorized version of the Snodgrass and Vanderwart (Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Learning and Memory 6:174-215, 1980) pictures (Rossion & Pourtois, Perception 33:217-236, 2004). New norms for image variability, body-object interaction [BOI], and subjective frequency collected in Russian, as well as new name agreement scores for the colorized pictures in French, are also reported. In both object-naming and object comprehension times, the name agreement, image agreement, and age-of-acquisition variables made significant independent contributions. Objective word frequency was reliable in object-naming latencies only. The variables of image variability, BOI, and subjective frequency were not significant in either object naming or object comprehension. Finally, imageability was reliable in both tasks. The new norms and object-naming and object recognition times are provided as supplemental materials.
    Behavior Research Methods 12/2012; 45(3). DOI:10.3758/s13428-012-0279-9 · 2.12 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article presents the NeoHelp visual stimulus set created to facilitate investigation of need-of-help recognition with clinical and normative populations of different ages, including children. Need-of-help recognition is one aspect of socioemotional development and a necessary precondition for active helping. The NeoHelp consists of picture pairs showing everyday situations: The first item in a pair depicts a child needing help to achieve a goal; the second one shows the child achieving the goal. Pictures of birds in analogue situations are also included. These control stimuli enable implementation of a human-animal categorization task which serves to separate behavioral correlates specific to need-of-help recognition from general differentiation processes. It is a concern in experimental research to ensure that results do not relate to systematic perceptual differences when comparing responses to categories of different content. Therefore, we not only derived the NeoHelp-pictures within a pair from one another by altering as little as possible, but also assessed their perceptual similarity empirically. We show that NeoHelp-picture pairs are very similar regarding low-level perceptual properties across content categories. We obtained data from 60 children in a broad age range (4 to 13 years) for three different paradigms, in order to assess whether the intended categorization and differentiation could be observed reliably in a normative population. Our results demonstrate that children can differentiate the pictures' content regarding both need-of-help category as well as species as intended in spite of the high perceptual similarities. We provide standard response characteristics (hit rates and response times) that are useful for future selection of stimuli and comparison of results across studies. We show that task requirements coherently determine which aspects of the pictures influence response characteristics. Thus, we present NeoHelp, the first open-access standardized visual stimuli set for investigation of need-of-help recognition and invite researchers to use and extend it.
    PLoS ONE 01/2014; 9(1):e84373. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0084373 · 3.53 Impact Factor
Show more