Article

Use of rocuronium and sugammadex for caesarean delivery in a patient with myasthenia gravis.

Department of Anaesthesia and Critical Care, Hôpital de Hautepierre, University of Strasbourg Strasbourg, France.
International journal of obstetric anesthesia (Impact Factor: 1.85). 05/2012; 21(3):286-7. DOI: 10.1016/j.ijoa.2012.02.006
Source: PubMed
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