Article

Excessive early gestational weight gain and risk of gestational diabetes mellitus in nulliparous women.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX, USA.
Obstetrics and Gynecology (Impact Factor: 4.8). 06/2012; 119(6):1227-33. DOI:10.1097/AOG.0b013e318256cf1a
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT To estimate whether there is an association between excessive early gestational weight gain and the development of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and excessive fetal growth.
This is a secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial of vitamins C and E in nulliparous low-risk women. Maternal weight gain from prepregnancy (self-reported) to 15-18 weeks of gestation was measured, and expected gestational weight gain was determined using the Institute of Medicine 2009 guidelines for each prepregnancy body mass index category. Excessive early gestational weight gain was defined as gestational weight gain greater than the upper range of the Institute of Medicine guidelines. Rates of GDM, birth weight greater than 4,000 g, and large for gestational age (LGA, birth weight 90 percentile or higher) were calculated and compared between women with excessive early gestational weight gain and early nonexcessive gestational weight gain (within or below Institute of Medicine guidelines).
A total of 7,985 women were studied. Excessive early gestational weight gain occurred in 47.5% of women. Ninety-three percent of women with excessive early gestational weight gain had total gestational weight gain greater than Institute of Medicine guidelines. In contrast, only 55% of women with nonexcessive early gestational weight gain had total gestational weight gain greater than Institute of Medicine guidelines (P<.001). Rates of GDM, LGA, and birth weight greater than 4,000 g were higher in women with excessive early gestational weight gain.
In our population, excessive early gestational weight gain occurred in 93% of women who had total gestational weight gain greater than the Institute of Medicine guidelines. In low-risk nulliparous women, excessive early gestational weight gain is associated with the development of GDM and excessive fetal growth.
II.

0 0
 · 
1 Bookmark
 · 
135 Views
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective:To assess the prognostic validity of the Institute of Medicine/National Research Council (IOM/NRC) week-specific cutoff values for inadequate or excessive total gestational weight gain (GWG) by 4-week intervals.Study Design:We merged data from two German cohorts (LMU cohort (all maternal-weight categories) and PEACHES cohort (obese women)) to provide information on GWG for 749 women (365 normal weight, 199 overweight and 185 obese). We calculated the prognostic values for suboptimal and excessive GWG according to the IOM/NRC cutoff values.Result:The positive predictive values for excessive total GWG for those who experienced excessive GWG early in pregnancy was 70.1% (95% confidence interval (CI) 60.5; 78.6) as of week 12/1 to 16/0 in normal-weight women, 89.5% (95% CI 75.2; 97.1) and 95.2 (76.2; 99.9) 95.2% (95% CI 76.2; 99.9) as of week 8/1 to 12/0 for overweight and obese women, respectively. In absence of excessive GWG as of week 12/1 to 16/0, normal-weight women had 77.5% (95% CI 77.1; 83.1) probability of not experiencing excessive total GWG (negative predictive value). In overweight and obese women, the negative predictive value was considerably lower up to week 24/1 to 28/0 (60.0% (95% CI 48.8; 70.5) in week 20/1 to 24/0 and 50.6% (95% CI 39.3; 61.9) in week 24/1 to 28/0). Most women with inadequate GWG in the first and second trimester had adequate total final GWG (positive predictive value for total inadequate GWG <50% up to week 16/1 to 20/0 in all groups).Conclusion:As women with excessive weight gain can be identified with high confidence if the GWG exceeds the IOM/NRC week-specific cutoff values, interventions may be initiated early in pregnancy.Journal of Perinatology advance online publication, 27 February 2014; doi:10.1038/jp.2014.22.
    Journal of perinatology: official journal of the California Perinatal Association 02/2014; · 1.59 Impact Factor
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective: Hispanic women have high rates of excessive and inadequate gestational weight gain (GWG) according to Institute of Medicine (IOM) guidelines. Observational studies suggest that physical activity may be associated with GWG but have been conflicting and were largely conducted in non-Hispanic white populations. Design and Methods: We prospectively evaluated the association between physical activity and compliance with GWG guidelines, total GWG, and rate of GWG among 1,276 Hispanic participants in Proyecto Buena Salud, a cohort study in Western Massachusetts. The Pregnancy Physical Activity Questionnaire was used to assess pre, early, mid, and late pregnancy physical activity according to both intensity (i.e., sedentary, moderate, and vigorous) and type (i.e., housework/caregiving, occupational, and sports/exercise). Results: A total of 26.9% of women gained within IOM guidelines, 21.2% had inadequate GWG, and 51.9% experienced excessive GWG. Overall, we did not observe statistically significant associations between type or intensity of physical activity during pre, early, mid, and late pregnancy and inadequate or excessive GWG, total GWG, or rate of GWG. Conclusions: In this prospective cohort study of Hispanic women, after controlling for important risk factors, pregnancy physical activity did not appear to be associated with GWG.
    Obesity 06/2013; · 3.92 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE:To examine the Institute of Medicine (IOM) guidelines for gestational weight gain (GWG) in insulin-resistant pregnancy.STUDY DESIGN:Secondary analysis of a prospective cohort of 435 women with type 2 or gestational diabetes from 2006 to 2010. The exposure was categorized as GWG less than, within or greater than the IOM recommendations for body mass index. The maternal outcome was a composite of preeclampsia, eclampsia, third- to fourth-degree laceration, readmission or wound infection. The neonatal outcome was a composite of preterm delivery, level 3 nursery admission, oxygen requirement >6 h, shoulder dystocia, 5-min Apgar3, umbilical cord arterial pH<7.1 or base excess <-12. Secondary outcomes were cesarean delivery (CD), macrosomia and small for gestational age (SGA).RESULT:Incidence of the maternal outcome did not differ with GWG (P=0.15). Women gaining more than recommended had an increased risk of CD (relative risk (RR) 1.31, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01 to 1.69) and the neonatal outcome (RR 1.40, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.95) compared with women gaining within the IOM recommendations. Women gaining less than recommended had an increased risk of SGA (RR 3.29, 95% CI 1.09 to 9.91) without a decrease in the risk of the maternal outcome (RR 0.93, 95% CI 0.49 to 1.78) or CD (RR 0.74, 95% CI 0.40 to 1.37) compared with women gaining within the IOM recommendations.CONCLUSION:Women with insulin resistance should be advised to gain within the current IOM guidelines.Journal of Perinatology advance online publication, 15 August 2013; doi:10.1038/jp.2013.100.
    Journal of perinatology: official journal of the California Perinatal Association 08/2013; · 1.59 Impact Factor

Full-text (2 Sources)

View
4 Downloads
Available from
Mar 14, 2014