Article

An overall review on insulin resistance in the commencement of type2 diabetes in south indian population

Journal of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Analysis (Impact Factor: 2.95). 03/2010; 3(3):1-5.

ABSTRACT ����� �� ��
����� ��� �
������ ���� ������
������� ���� ��� ���������
� ��� ����� �� ��

������ ����� � ������ ���
�� ������ ���
��������
������
������ � �������������� ���� �������������� ���
����
��������� � ����� �������������
������ �������� ���� ����� ��
����
��� ���������� ���������������������
����� ����������������� �����!���� �������������"�� ������ ���� ����������� ������� ���
�� � �����#���
�� ��
���� �������� ������ ��$� % ���� ������ ����� �� ��
����� ��� �������������� !���� �� �������� ��� � ������
����� ����������������� ���� �����#�� ��
��������������������
��&������
����������� ��������������������������� �������������
��� � ���� ����� ����� ���������� ������ ������ �� �� ������ ��� ����� ��� ����� �������� �������������� ���� ���������� �!�� ����� �������
�������� ��������������������� ���������������������� ���$����� ��� �������������� ��� ��������������
��������������� ���� ���
���&����� ��������������������������������
������������������� �������� ���
�������������������
����������� �� ��
����� ��� �
������ ���� ������
������� ���� ��� ���������
� ��� ����� �� ��

������ ����� � ������ ���
�� ������ ���
��������
������
������ � �������������� ���� �������������� ���
����
��������� � ����� �������������
������ �������� ���� ����� ��
����
��� ���������� ���������������������
����� ����������������� �����!���� �������������"�� ������ ���� ����������� ������� ���
�� � �����#���
�� ��
���� �������� ������ ��$� % ���� ������ ����� �� ��
����� ��� �������������� !���� �� �������� ��� � ������
����� ����������������� ���� �����#�� ��
��������������������
��&������
����������� ��������������������������� �������������
��� � ���� ����� ����� ���������� ������ ������ �� �� ������ ��� ����� ��� ����� �������� �������������� ���� ���������� �!�� ����� �������
�������� ��������������������� ���������������������� ���$����� ��� �������������� ��� ��������������
��������������� ���� ���
���&����� ��������������������������������
������������������� �������� ���
�������������������
����������� �� ��
����� ��� �
������ ���� ������
������� ���� ��� ���������
� ��� ����� �� ��

������ ����� � ������ ���
�� ������ ���
��������
������
������ � �������������� ���� �������������� ���
����
��������� � ����� �������������
������ �������� ���� ����� ��
����
��� ���������� ���������������������
����� ����������������� �����!���� �������������"�� ������ ���� ����������� ������� ���
�� � �����#���
�� ��
���� �������� ������ ��$� % ���� ������ ����� �� ��
����� ��� �������������� !���� �� �������� ��� � ������
����� ����������������� ���� �����#�� ��
��������������������
��&������
����������� ��������������������������� �������������
��� � ���� ����� ����� ���������� ������ ������ �� �� ������ ��� ����� ��� ����� �������� �������������� ���� ���������� �!�� ����� �������
�������� ��������������������� ���������������������� ���$����� ��� �������������� ��� ��������������
��������������� ���� ���
���&����� ��������������������������������
������������������� �������� ���
�������������������
������v����� �� ��
����� ��� �
������ ���� ������
������� ���� ��� ���������
� ��� ����� �� ��

������ ����� � ������ ���
�� ������ ���
��������
������
������ � �������������� ���� �������������� ���
����
��������� � ����� �������������
������ �������� ���� ����� ��
����
��� ���������� ���������������������
����� ����������������� �����!���� �������������"�� ������ ���� ����������� ������� ���
�� � �����#���
�� ��
���� �������� ������ ��$� % ���� ������ ����� �� ��
����� ��� �������������� !���� �� �������� ��� � ������
����� ����������������� ���� �����#�� ��
��������������������
��&������
����������� ��������������������������� �������������
��� � ���� ����� ����� ���������� ������ ������ �� �� ������ ��� ����� ��� ����� �������� �������������� ���� ���������� �!�� ����� �������
�������� ��������������������� ���������������������� ���$����� ��� �������������� ��� ��������������
��������������� ���� ���
���&����� ��������������������������������
������������������� �������� ���
�������������������
������

0 Bookmarks
 · 
82 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To examine body size and fat measurements of babies born in rural India and compare them with white Caucasian babies born in an industrialised country. Community-based observational study in rural India, and comparison with data from an earlier study in the UK, measured using similar methods. A total of 631 term babies born in six rural villages, near the city of Pune, Maharashtra, India, and 338 term babies born in the Princess Anne Hospital, Southampton, UK. Maternal weight and height, and neonatal weight, length, head, mid-upper-arm and abdominal circumferences, subscapular and triceps skinfold thicknesses, and placental weight. The Indian mothers were younger, lighter, shorter and had a lower mean body mass index (BMI) (mean age, weight, height and BMI: 21.4 y, 44.6 kg, 1.52 m, and 18.2 kg/m(2)) than Southampton mothers (26.8 y, 63.6 kg, 1.63 m and 23.4 kg/m(2)). They gave birth to lighter babies (mean birthweight: 2.7 kg compared with 3.5 kg). Compared to Southampton babies, the Indian babies were small in all body measurements, the smallest being abdominal circumference (s.d. score: -2.38; 95% CI: -2.48 to -2.29) and mid-arm circumference (s.d. score: -1.82; 95% CI: -1.89 to -1.75), while the most preserved measurement was the subscapular skinfold thickness (s.d. score: -0.53; 95% CI: -0.61 to -0.46). Skinfolds were relatively preserved in the lightest babies (below the 10th percentile of birthweight) in both populations. Small Indian babies have small abdominal viscera and low muscle mass, but preserve body fat during their intrauterine development. This body composition may persist postnatally and predispose to an insulin-resistant state.
    International Journal of Obesity 03/2003; 27(2):173-80. · 5.22 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Rural-urban and ethnic comparisons of impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes mellitus were made in the biracial population of Fiji in 1980. No statistically significant differences existed in age-standardized impaired glucose tolerance prevalence between rural and urban groups or between Melanesians and Indians. The age-standardized prevalence of diabetes in the rural Melanesian male population was one-third that of the urban male population (1.1 vs. 3.5%). In females, there was a sixfold rural-urban difference (1.2 vs. 7.1%). By contrast, rural and urban Indians had similar rates (12.1 vs. 12.9% for males; 11.3 vs. 11.0% for females). Standardization of two-hour plasma glucose for age and obesity did not eliminate the rural-urban difference in plasma glucose concentration for Melanesian males and females. The results in Melanesians confirm previously reported rural-urban diabetes prevalence differences, and suggest that factors other than obesity, such as differences in physical activity, diet, stress, or other, as yet undetermined, factors contribute to this difference. The absence of a rural-urban difference in diabetes prevalence in Indians may suggest that genetic factors are more important for producing diabetes in this ethnic group, or that causative environmental factors such as diet operate similarly upon both the rural and the urban populations.
    American Journal of Epidemiology 12/1983; 118(5):673-88. · 4.78 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: One third of the Indian babies are of low birth weight (<2.5 kg), and this is attributed to maternal undernutrition. We therefore examined the relationship between maternal nutrition and birth size in a prospective study of 797 rural Indian women, focusing on macronutrient intakes, dietary quality and micronutrient status. Maternal intakes (24-h recall and food frequency questionnaire) and erythrocyte folate, serum ferritin and vitamin C concentrations were measured at 18 +/- 2 and 28 +/- 2 wk gestation. Mothers were short (151.9 +/- 5.1 cm) and underweight (41.7 +/- 5.1 kg) and had low energy and protein intakes at 18 wk (7.4 +/- 2.1 MJ and 45.4 +/- 14.1 g) and 28 wk (7.0 +/- 2.0 MJ and 43.5 +/- 13.5 g) of gestation. Mean birth weight and length of term babies were also low (2665 +/- 358 g and 47.8 +/- 2.0 cm, respectively). Energy and protein intakes were not associated with birth size, but higher fat intake at wk 18 was associated with neonatal length (P < 0.001), birth weight (P < 0.05) and triceps skinfold thickness (P < 0.05) when adjusted for sex, parity and gestation. However, birth size was strongly associated with the consumption of milk at wk 18 (P < 0.05) and of green leafy vegetables (P < 0.001) and fruits (P < 0.01) at wk 28 of gestation even after adjustment for potentially confounding variables. Erythrocyte folate at 28 wk gestation was positively associated with birth weight (P < 0.001). The lack of association between size at birth and maternal energy and protein intake but strong associations with folate status and with intakes of foods rich in micronutrients suggest that micronutrients may be important limiting factors for fetal growth in this undernourished community.
    Journal of Nutrition 04/2001; 131(4):1217-24. · 4.20 Impact Factor

Full-text

Download
0 Downloads
Available from
Nov 25, 2014