Article

Choroidal thickness, vascular hyperpermeability, and complement factor H in age-related macular degeneration and polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy.

Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan.
Investigative ophthalmology & visual science (Impact Factor: 3.43). 05/2012; 53(7):3663-72. DOI: 10.1167/iovs.12-9619
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT To investigate the relationship between subfoveal choroidal thickness, choroidal vascular hyperpermeability, and complement factor H (CFH) gene polymorphism in typical age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV).
Fifty-eight patients with typical AMD and 63 patients with PCV underwent fluorescein angiography, indocyanine green angiography (IA), and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) using enhanced depth imaging (EDI). Subfoveal choroidal thickness was measured using EDI-OCT images, and choroidal hyperpermeability was evaluated using late-phase IA images. The major AMD-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms were genotyped in 86 patients.
Mean subfoveal choroidal thickness was significantly lower in eyes with typical AMD than that in eyes with PCV (P = 0.025). Subfoveal choroidal thickness was greater in eyes with choroidal hyperpermeability than that in eyes without it in typical AMD (P < 0.001) and PCV (P = 0.020), and in the fellow eyes of typical AMD (P < 0.001) and PCV (P = 0.027). In eyes without choroidal hyperpermeability, the mean subfoveal choroidal thickness was greater in PCV than that in typical AMD (P = 0.001). Choroidal thickness decreased after photodynamic therapy combined with intravitreal ranibizumab in typical AMD (P = 0.016) and PCV (P = 0.036). In eyes with PCV, the I62V polymorphism in the CFH gene contributed to choroidal thickness (P = 0.043).
Choroidal thickness is related to the AMD subtypes, choroidal hyperpermeability, and I62V CFH gene polymorphism. In eyes without choroidal hyperpermeability, EDI-OCT is useful as an auxiliary measure for differentiating typical AMD and PCV.

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