Article

Healthy Eating, Aerobic and Resistance Training in Youth (HEARTY): study rationale, design and methods.

School of Human Kinetics, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1N 6N5.
Contemporary clinical trials (Impact Factor: 1.99). 04/2012; 33(4):839-47. DOI: 10.1016/j.cct.2012.04.004
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The objective of the Healthy Eating Aerobic and Resistance Training in Youth (HEARTY) trial (ClinicalTrials.Gov # NCT00195858) was to examine the effects of resistance training, with and without aerobic training, on percent body fat in sedentary, post-pubertal overweight or obese adolescents aged 14-18 years. This paper describes the HEARTY study rationale, design and methods.
After a 4-week supervised low-intensity exercise run-in period, 304 overweight or obese adolescents with a body mass index≥85th percentile for age and sex were randomized to 4 groups for 22 weeks (5 months): diet+aerobic exercise, diet+resistance exercise, diet+combined aerobic and resistance exercise, or a diet only waiting-list control. All participants received dietary counseling designed to promote healthy eating with a maximum daily energy deficit of -250 kcal.
The primary outcome is percent body fat measured by Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Secondary outcomes include changes in anthropometry, regional body composition, resting energy expenditure, cardiorespiratory fitness, musculoskeletal fitness, cardiometabolic risk markers, and psychological health.
To our knowledge, HEARTY is the largest clinical trial examining effects of aerobic training, resistance training, and combined aerobic and resistance training on changes in adiposity and cardiometabolic risk markers in overweight and obese adolescents. The findings will have important clinical implications regarding the role that resistance training should play in the management of adolescent obesity and its co-morbidities.

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