Article

The 1000 Genomes Project: data management and community access

European Bioinformatics Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge, UK.
Nature Methods (Impact Factor: 25.95). 04/2012; 9(5):459-62. DOI: 10.1038/nmeth.1974
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The 1000 Genomes Project was launched as one of the largest distributed data collection and analysis projects ever undertaken in biology. In addition to the primary scientific goals of creating both a deep catalog of human genetic variation and extensive methods to accurately discover and characterize variation using new sequencing technologies, the project makes all of its data publicly available. Members of the project data coordination center have developed and deployed several tools to enable widespread data access.

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