Article

Surgical indications for arthroscopic management of femoroacetabular impingement.

Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Department of Surgery, McMaster University, 1200 Main St W, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Arthroscopy The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery (Impact Factor: 3.1). 04/2012; 28(8):1170-9. DOI: 10.1016/j.arthro.2012.01.010
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The clinical literature was systematically reviewed to determine the consistently reported indications for arthroscopic management of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI).
Two databases (Medline and EMBASE) were screened for clinical studies involving the arthroscopic surgical management of FAI. A full-text review of eligible studies was conducted, and the references were searched. Articles published from 1980 until June 2011 were included, and the inclusion criteria were as follows: studies of human patients of all ages and genders with FAI, studies with a minimum of 6 months of patient follow-up, and studies reporting clinical outcome data. A quality assessment of the included articles was conducted.
We included 20 articles in this review, involving a total of 1,368 patients. We identified a lack of consensus on clinical and radiographic indications for the arthroscopic management of FAI. The indications varied from a positive impingement sign (45%) and symptoms or pain for more than 6 months (35%) to a series of positive special tests (25%). Commonly reported radiographic indicators for arthroscopic FAI management included the following: results from a computed tomography scan or magnetic resonance imaging (60%), cam or pincer lesions evident on anteroposterior and/or lateral radiographs (50%), loss of sphericity of the femoral neck (30%), acetabular retroversion (30%), magnetic resonance arthrography (25%), reduction in head-neck offset (25%), an alpha angle greater than 50° (25%), and coxa profunda (25%).
We found that there was great inconsistency among the indications for arthroscopic management of FAI. Clinical and radiographic indices remain largely unvalidated. This review highlights the need for more consistent reporting of surgical indications for the arthroscopic management of FAI. Future research should explore what combination of clinical and radiographic indications should be best used to determine arthroscopic FAI management.
Level IV, systematic review of Level II to IV studies.

1 Bookmark
 · 
112 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Currently, three surgical approaches are available for the treatment of cam femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), namely surgical hip dislocation (SHD), hip arthroscopy (HA), and the miniopen anterior approach of the hip (MO). Although previous systematic reviews have compared these different approaches, an overall assessment of their performance is not available. QUESTIONS/PURPOSES: We therefore executed a multidimensional structured comparison considering the benefits, opportunities, costs, and risk (BOCR) of the different approaches using multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA). METHODS: A MCDA using analytic hierarchical process (AHP) was conducted to compare SHD, HA, and MO in terms of BOCR on the basis of available evidence, institutional experience, costs, and our understanding of pathophysiology of FAI. A preclinical decision-making model was created for cam FAI to establish the surgical approach that better accomplishes our objectives regarding the surgical treatment. A total score of an alternative's utility and sensitivity analysis was established using commercially available AHP software. RESULTS: The AHP model based on BOCR showed that MO is the best surgical approach for cam FAI (normalized score: 0.38) followed by HA (normalized score: 0.36) and SHD (normalized score: 0.25). The sensitivity analysis showed that HA would turn into the best alternative if the variable risks account for more than 61.8% of the priority during decision-making. In any other decision-making scenario, MO remains as the best alternative. CONCLUSIONS: Using a recognized method for decision-making, this study provides supportive data for the use of MO approach as our preferred surgical approach for cam FAI. The latter is predominantly derived from the lower cost of this approach. Our data may be considered a proxy performance measurement for surgical approaches in cam FAI. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level II, economic and decision analyses. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.
    Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research 03/2013; · 2.79 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The purpose of this systematic review is to evaluate the consistency of the reporting of clinical and radiographic outcomes after arthroscopic management of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). METHODS: Two databases (Medline and EMBASE) were screened for clinical studies involving the arthroscopic management of FAI. A full-text review of eligible studies was conducted, and the references were searched. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied to the searched studies, and a quality assessment was completed for included studies. RESULTS: We identified 29 eligible studies involving 2,816 patients. There was a lack of consensus with regard to reported outcomes (clinical and radiographic) after arthroscopic treatment of FAI. Clinical outcomes reported include the Harris Hip Score (45%) and the Non-Arthritic Hip Scale (28%), range of motion (34%), pain scores (24%), and patient satisfaction (28%). The most commonly reported radiographic outcomes included the alpha angle (38%), head-neck offset (14%), and degenerative changes (21%). CONCLUSIONS: There is significant variation in reported clinical and radiographic outcomes after arthroscopic treatment of FAI. This study highlights the need for consistent outcome reporting after arthroscopic FAI surgery. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level IV, systematic review of Level II, III, and IV studies.
    Arthroscopy The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery 02/2013; · 3.10 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: As the body of literature on femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) continues to grow, clinicians turn to systematic reviews to remain current with the best available evidence. The quality of systematic reviews in the FAI literature is currently unknown. The goal of this study was to assess the quality of the reporting of systematic reviews addressing FAI over the last 11 years (2003-2014) and to identify the specific methodological shortcomings and strengths.
    Knee surgery, sports traumatology, arthroscopy : official journal of the ESSKA. 07/2014;

Full-text

View
10 Downloads
Available from
May 27, 2014