Article

Pain and activity levels before and after platelet-rich plasma injection treatment of patellar tendinopathy: a prospective cohort study and the influence of previous treatments.

Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, St Elisabeth Hospital Tilburg, Tilburg, The Netherlands.
International Orthopaedics (Impact Factor: 2.32). 04/2012; 36(9):1941-6. DOI: 10.1007/s00264-012-1540-7
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of patients with patellar tendinopathy treated with platelet-rich plasma injections (PRP). Additionally, this study examined whether certain characteristics, such as activity level or previous treatment affected the results.
Patients (n = 36) were asked to fill in the Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment - Patellar questionnaire (VISA-P) and visual analogue scales (VAS), assessing pain in activities of daily life (ADL), during work and sports, before and after treatment with PRP. Of these patients, 14 had been treated before with cortisone, ethoxysclerol, and/or surgical treatment (group 1), while the remaining patients had not been treated before (group 2).
Overall, group 1 and group 2 improved significantly on the VAS scales (p < .0.05). However, group 2 also improved on VISA-P (p = .0.003), while group 1 showed less healing potential (p = 0.060). Although the difference between group 1 and group 2 at follow-up was not considered clinically meaningful, over time both groups showed a clinically significant improvement.
After PRP treatment, patients with patellar tendinopathy showed a statistically significant improvement. In addition, these improvements can also be considered clinically meaningful. However, patients who were not treated before with ethoxysclerol, cortisone, and/or surgical treatment showed the improvement.

0 Bookmarks
 · 
94 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is expanding to numerous medical fields, including orthopedic surgery and sports medicine. The popularity of this new treatment option has prompted a rapid increase in research endeavors; however, the differences in application technique and the composition of PRP have made it difficult to compare results or make any firm conclusions regarding efficacy. The purpose of this article is twofold. First, to recommend details that should be provided in basic science and clinical PRP studies to allow meaningful comparisons between studies which may lead to a better understanding of efficacy. Second, to provide an understanding of the different PRP preparations and their clinical relevance. There are biochemical rationales for the use of PRP because it addresses several aspects of the healing process, including cell proliferation and tissue matrix regeneration, inflammation, nociception, infection, and hemostasis, all of which will be addressed. Given the current understanding of the importance the composition of PRP plays in tissue regeneration, it is likely that our future understanding of PRP will dictate 'customizing' the PRP preparation to the specific pathology of interest. The potential complications following PRP use are minor, and thus it appears to be a safe treatment option with a variety of potentially beneficial effects to injured musculoskeletal tissues.
    Sports medicine (Auckland, N.Z.). 04/2014;
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background. Autologous whole blood and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) have been both suggested to treat chronic tennis elbow. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of PRP versus autologous whole blood local injection in chronic tennis elbow. Methods. Forty patients with tennis elbow were randomly divided into 2 groups. Group 1 was treated with a single injection of 2 mL of autologous PRP and group 2 with 2 mL of autologous blood. Tennis elbow strap, stretching, and strengthening exercises were administered for both groups during a 2-month followup. Pain and functional improvements were assessed using visual analog scale (VAS), modified Mayo Clinic performance index for the elbow, and pressure pain threshold (PPT) at 0, 4, and 8 weeks. Results. All pain and functional variables including VAS, PPT, and Mayo scores improved significantly in both groups 4 weeks after injection. No statistically significant difference was noted between groups regarding pain scores in 4-week follow-up examination (P > 0.05). At 8-week reevaluations, VAS and Mayo scores improved only in PRP group (P < 0.05). Conclusion. PRP and autologous whole blood injections are both effective to treat chronic lateral epicondylitis. PRP might be slightly superior in 8-week followup. However, further studies are suggested to get definite conclusion.
    Pain research and treatment. 01/2014; 2014:191525.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Platelet rich plasma has been used in the treatment of tendinopathies, but the sonographic modifications of tendons have received less attention. In this paper we report the results of an ultrasound evaluation, performed during and after plasma injection, in patients with tendinopathy. The sonographic abnormalities and neovascularization were registered in twenty tendons. Three plasma injections (once a week) were performed, and a rehabilitation program was recommended. Pain and patients' satisfaction were evaluated. During the injections plasma spread along the collagen fibers, and an intratendineous cleft produced by the injected volume was observed. At 12 months two tendons regained a normal echotexture, while neovessels were absent in seven. The remaining tendons showed less abnormalities and neovascularization in comparison with baseline. The clinical improvement was earlier and more consistent. The discrepancy between the ultrasound and clinical results may be explained by the peculiar modalities of tendon healing induced by plasma administration.
    Muscles, ligaments and tendons journal. 01/2014; 4(1):29-34.

Full-text (2 Sources)

View
5 Downloads
Available from
Jun 10, 2014