Screening a library of 1600 adamantyl ureas for anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis activity in vitro and for better physical chemical properties for bioavailability

Colorado State University, Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Pathology, 1682 Campus Delivery Ft. Collins, CO 80523-1682, USA.
Bioorganic & medicinal chemistry (Impact Factor: 2.79). 03/2012; 20(10):3255-62. DOI: 10.1016/j.bmc.2012.03.058
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Adamantyl ureas were previously identified as a group of compounds active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in culture with minimum inhibitor concentrations (MICs) below 0.1 μg/ml. These compounds have been shown to target MmpL3, a protein involved in secretion of trehalose mono-mycolate. They also inhibit both human soluble epoxide hydrolase (hsEH) and M. tuberculosis epoxide hydrolases. However, active compounds to date have high cLogP's and are poorly soluble, leading to low bioavailability and thus limiting any therapeutic application. In this study, a library of 1600 ureas (mostly adamantyl ureas), which were synthesized for the purpose of increasing the bioavailability of inhibitors of hsEH, was screened for activity against M. tuberculosis. 1-Adamantyl-3-phenyl ureas with a polar para substituent were found to retain moderate activity against M. tuberculosis and one of these compounds was shown to be present in serum after oral administration to mice. However, neither it, nor a closely related analog, reduced M. tuberculosis infection in mice. No correlation between in vitro potency against M. tuberculosis and the hsEH inhibition were found supporting the concept that activity against hsEH and M. tuberculosis can be separated. Also there was a lack of correlation with cLogP and inhibition of the growth of M. tuberculosis. Finally, members of two classes of adamantyl ureas that contained polar components to increase their bioavailability, but lacked efficacy against growing M. tuberculosis, were found to taken up by the bacterium as effectively as a highly active apolar urea suggesting that these modifications to increase bioavailability affected the interaction of the urea against its target rather than making them unable to enter the bacterium.

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Available from: Christophe Morisseau, Sep 28, 2015
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