Conference Paper

Bi-modal search using complementary sensing (olfaction/vision) for odour source localisation

Intelligent Robotics Res. Centre, Monash Univ., Clayton, Vic.
DOI: 10.1109/ROBOT.2006.1642005 Conference: Robotics and Automation, 2006. ICRA 2006. Proceedings 2006 IEEE International Conference on
Source: IEEE Xplore

ABSTRACT Odour localisation in an enclosed area is difficult due to the formation of sectors of circulating airflow. Well-defined plumes do not exist, and reactive plume following may not be possible. Odour localisation has been partially achieved in this environment by using knowledge of airflow, and a search that relies on chemical sensing and reasoning. However the results are not specific, with the odour source only restricted to a broad area. This paper presents a solution to the problem by introducing a second search stage using visual sensing. It therefore comprises a bi-modal, two-stage search, with each stage exploiting complementary sensing modalities. This paper presents details of the method and experimental results

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