Article

A storage system for use with binary-digital computing machines

Proceedings of the IEE - Part II: Power Engineering 05/1949; DOI: 10.1049/pi-2.1949.0078
Source: IEEE Xplore

ABSTRACT The requirement for digital computing machines of large storage capacity has led to the development of a storage system in which the digits are represented by a charge pattern on the screen of a cathode-ray tube. Initial tests have been confined to commercial tubes. Short-term memory of the order of 0.2 sec is provided by the insulating properties of the screen material. Long-term memory is obtained by regenerating the charge pattern at a frequency greater than 5 c/s. The regeneration makes accurate stabilization of the position of the charge pattern on the c. r. tube unnecessary. The properties required of a storage system, and its operation as part of a machine, are stated. If such a machine were operated in the series mode, an instruction would be set up and obeyed in 600 ¿sec.

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