Article

Time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy: Imaging based on Raman free induction decay

Harvard University, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138
Applied Physics Letters (Impact Factor: 3.79). 04/2002; DOI: 10.1063/1.1456262
Source: IEEE Xplore

ABSTRACT A time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscope allows three-dimensional imaging based on Raman free induction decay of molecular vibration with no requirement for labeling of the sample with natural or artificial fluorophores. A major benefit of the technique is the capability to completely remove nonresonant coherent background signal from the sample and the solvent, and thus increasing the detection sensitivity of CARS microscopy significantly. © 2002 American Institute of Physics.

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