Article

Spectroscopic properties of Er3+ doped glass ceramics containing Sr2GdF7 nanocrystals

Department of Material Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hang-hsien, Zhejiang Sheng, China
Applied Physics Letters (Impact Factor: 3.52). 10/2006; 89(11):111919 - 111919-3. DOI: 10.1063/1.2355363
Source: IEEE Xplore

ABSTRACT The Er 3+ doped transparent oxyfluoride glass ceramics containing Sr 2 Gd F 7 nanocrystals were prepared and their spectroscopic properties were discussed. The formation of Sr 2 Gd F 7 nanocrystals in the glass ceramics was confirmed by x-ray diffraction. The split peaks of the upconversion and near infrared emission bands of the Er 3+ doped glass ceramics can be observed. The upconversion luminescence intensity of Er 3+ in the glass ceramics increased significantly with the increasing heat treated temperature. The luminescence decay curves and time-resolved spectra indicated that the lifetime of the 4S3/2 state of Er 3+ in the glass ceramic was longer than that in the glass.

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