Article

Prevention of infection in the obstetric patient. Foreword.

Division of Infectious Diseases and Department of Clinical Epidemiology, The Ohio State University Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio, USA.
Clinical obstetrics and gynecology (Impact Factor: 2.06). 06/2012; 55(2):471-3. DOI: 10.1097/GRF.0b013e3182516c5f
Source: PubMed
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