Conference Paper

Marker-less tracking for respiratory motion correction in nuclear medicine

Centre for Vision, Speech & Signal Process., Univ. of Surrey, Guildford, UK
DOI: 10.1109/NSSMIC.2010.5874374 Conference: Nuclear Science Symposium Conference Record (NSS/MIC), 2010 IEEE
Source: IEEE Xplore

ABSTRACT This paper present preliminary work in developing a method of using a marker-less tracking system to analyze the natural temporal variations in chest wall configuration during breathing, thus avoiding reliance on a limited number of fiducial markers. This involves using a marker-less video capture of the motion of the abdominal-chest surface and the development of a B-spline model to parameterize this motion. The advantage of the marker-less system that is non-invasive and non-ionizing, thus facilitating high throughput without the need for marker-based patient set-up time.

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