Clinical practice guidelines for breast cancer rehabilitation: Syntheses of guideline recommendations and qualitative appraisals

Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Cancer (Impact Factor: 4.89). 04/2012; 118(8 Suppl):2312-24. DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27461
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Despite strides in early detection and management of breast cancer, the primary treatments for this disease continue to result in physical impairments for some of the nearly 3 million people diagnosed annually. Over the past decade, evidence-based clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) have been developed with goals of preventing and ameliorating these impairments. However, translation of these guidelines into clinical practice needs to be accelerated.
Relevant health science databases (2001-2011) were searched to identify CPGs on breast cancer rehabilitation for the following impairments: upper extremity restrictions, lymphedema, pain, fatigue, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, treatment-related cardiotoxicity, bone health, and weight management.
Recommendations from 19 relevant CPGs were first summarized by impairment within tables; commonalities across guidelines, within each impairment, were then synthesized within the article. The CPGs were rated using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II (AGREE II); wide variability was noted in rigor of development, clarity of presentation, and stakeholder involvement. The most rigorous and comprehensive of those rated was the adult cancer pain guideline from the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network.
Based on a large body of evidence published in recent years, including randomized trials and systematic reviews, there is an urgent need for updating the guidelines on upper extremity musculoskeletal impairments and lymphedema. Furthermore, additional research is needed to provide an evidence base for developing rehabilitation guidelines on management of other impairments identified in the prospective surveillance model, eg, arthralgia.

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Available from: Susan R Harris, Sep 26, 2015
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    • "Guidelines targeted to elderly patients with breast cancer include the EUSOMA guidelines[17] and NCCN guidelines[18], and guidelines for younger women with breast cancer provided discussions on women's health issues such as fertility and early menopause[19] [20]. Other guidelines consulted covered specific issues such as pain[21e23], fatigue[24] [25], anemia[26], insomnia[27], lymphedema[28], nausea and vomiting[29e33], mucositis[34], diarrhea[35], depression and distress[36] [37], nutrition[38], rehabilitation[28], exercise[39], bone modifying agents[40e42], granulocyte-colony stimulating growth factor[42], and genetics[43]. Table 3 Health systems resource allocations: health education, psychosocial and spiritual patient-support during treatment. "
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    ABSTRACT: Breast cancer patients may have unmet supportive care needs during treatment, including symptom management of treatment-related toxicities, and educational, psychosocial, and spiritual needs. Delivery of supportive care is often a low priority in low- and middle-income settings, and is also dependent on resources available. This consensus statement describes twelve key recommendations for supportive care during treatment in low- and middle-income countries, identified by an expert international panel as part of the 5th Breast Health Global Initiative (BHGI) Global Summit for Supportive Care, which was held in October 2012, in Vienna, Austria. Panel recommendations are presented in a 4-tier resource-stratified table to illustrate how health systems can provide supportive care services during treatment to breast cancer patients, starting at a basic level of resource allocation and incrementally adding program resources as they become available. These recommendations include: health professional and patient and family education; management of treatment related toxicities, management of treatment-related symptoms of fatigue, insomnia and non-specific pain, and management of psychosocial and spiritual issues related to breast cancer treatment. Establishing supportive care during breast cancer treatment will help ensure that breast cancer patients receive comprehensive care that can help 1) improve adherence to treatment recommendations, 2) manage treatment-related toxicities and other treatment related symptoms, and 3) address the psychosocial and spiritual aspects of breast cancer and breast cancer treatments.
    The Breast 10/2013; 22(5):593–605. DOI:10.1016/j.breast.2013.07.050 · 2.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The current model of care for individuals with breast cancer focuses on treatment of the disease, followed by ongoing surveillance to detect recurrence. This approach lacks attention to patients' physical and functional well-being. Breast cancer treatment sequelae can lead to physical impairments and functional limitations. Common impairments include pain, fatigue, upper-extremity dysfunction, lymphedema, weakness, joint arthralgia, neuropathy, weight gain, cardiovascular effects, and osteoporosis. Evidence supports prospective surveillance for early identification and treatment as a means to prevent or mitigate many of these concerns. This article proposes a prospective surveillance model for physical rehabilitation and exercise that can be integrated with disease treatment to create a more comprehensive approach to survivorship health care. The goals of the model are to promote surveillance for common physical impairments and functional limitations associated with breast cancer treatment; to provide education to facilitate early identification of impairments; to introduce rehabilitation and exercise intervention when physical impairments are identified; and to promote and support physical activity and exercise behaviors through the trajectory of disease treatment and survivorship. The model is the result of a multidisciplinary meeting of research and clinical experts in breast cancer survivorship and representatives of relevant professional and advocacy organizations. The proposed model identifies time points during breast cancer care for assessment of and education about physical impairments. Ultimately, implementation of the model may influence incidence and severity of breast cancer treatment-related physical impairments. As such, the model seeks to optimize function during and after treatment and positively influence a growing survivorship community.
    Cancer 04/2012; 118(8 Suppl):2191-200. DOI:10.1002/cncr.27476 · 4.89 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women. Along with improvements in treatment, the number of women who survive breast cancer has increased. Rehabilitation can alleviate post-treatment side effects and maintain quality of life. This study aimed to explore the use of rehabilitation among a cohort of patients diagnosed with breast cancer. A retrospective longitudinal cohort study was conducted using a National Health Insurance (NHI) research database in Taiwan. The study cohort consisted of 632 patients with breast cancer diagnosed in 2005. Their NHI claims over a period spanning 2005 through 2009 were analyzed. Overall, 39.6% of the cohort received rehabilitation therapy, with 9,691 rehabilitation visits claimed (an average of 38.8 visits per user). The prevalence of rehabilitation service use among the cohort was 16.5%, 13.3%, 13.0%, 13.3%, and 12.8% in the years 2005 through 2009, respectively. The average number of visits per rehabilitation user was 16.8, 25.0, 31.1, 24.2, and 23.8 in the years 2005 through 2009, respectively. Most rehabilitation therapy occurred as an outpatient service (96.0%). Physical therapy was the most commonly used form of rehabilitation (84.2%), followed by occupational therapy (15.4%). The most frequently recorded diagnoses were malignant neoplasm of the female breast, peripheral enthesopathies and allied syndromes, and osteoarthrosis and allied disorders. Only a small proportion of patients with breast cancer received rehabilitation therapy in the first five years after diagnosis. The average number of rehabilitation visits per user peaked in the third year after diagnosis.
    BMC Health Services Research 08/2012; 12(1):282. DOI:10.1186/1472-6963-12-282 · 1.71 Impact Factor
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