Article

Serotype replacement after pneumococcal vaccination.

The Lancet (Impact Factor: 39.21). 04/2012; 379(9824):1387-8; author reply 1388-9. DOI: 10.1016/S0140-6736(12)60589-3
Source: PubMed
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