In the clinic. Eating disorders.

Annals of internal medicine (Impact Factor: 17.81). 04/2012; 156(7):ITC4-1, ITC4-2, ITC4-3, ITC4-4, ITC4-5, ITC4-6, ITC4-7, ITC4-8, ITC4-9, ITC4-10, ITC4-11, ITC4-12, ITC4-13, ITC4-14, ITC4-15, quiz ITC4-16. DOI: 10.1059/0003-4819-156-7-201204030-01004
Source: PubMed


This issue provides a clinical overview of eating disorders focusing on prevention, diagnosis, treatment, practice improvement, and patient information. Readers can complete the accompanying CME quiz for 1.5 credits. Only ACP members and individual subscribers can access the electronic features of In the Clinic. Non-subscribers who wish to access this issue of In the Clinic can elect "Pay for View." Subscribers can receive 1.5 category 1 CME credits by completing the CME quiz that accompanies this issue of In the Clinic. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including PIER (Physicians' Information and Education Resource) and MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic from these primary sources in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing division and with assistance of science writers and physician writers. Editorial consultants from PIER and MKSAP provide expert review of the content. Readers who are interested in these primary resources for more detail can consult,, and other resources referenced within each issue of In the Clinic.

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    ABSTRACT: The authors examine the differential diagnosis for gastrointestinal disorders that should be considered in individuals who present with nonspecific gastrointestinal and nutritional complaints suggestive of an eating disorder. This review first identifies diseases with which eating disorders are often confused and then explores features in the history, physical examination, and laboratory studies which can provide clues to the cause of the patient's symptoms. In addition, it discusses the recommended evaluation and treatments for the gastrointestinal diseases that most commonly mimic the presentation of eating disorders, including Crohn disease (CrD), celiac disease, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). The ubiquitous nature of the gastrointestinal complaints requires the clinician to consider a broad differential diagnosis when evaluating a patient for an eating disorder.
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