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Cardioprotective effects of Commiphora mukul against isoprenaline-induced cardiotoxicity: a biochemical and histopathological evaluation.

Department of Pharmacology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, 110 029, India.
Journal of Environmental Biology (Impact Factor: 0.55). 11/2011; 32(6):731-8.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Commiphora mukul commonly known as Guggul is one of the oldest and commonly consumed herb for promoting heart and vascular health. Present study was undertaken to evaluate cardioprotective potential of Commiphora mukul against isoprenaline-induced myocardial necrosis in rats. Wistar albino rats were divided into three main groups: sham (saline only), isoprenaline control (saline and isoprenaline) and Commiphora mukul treated (Commiphora mukul and isoprenaline) groups. Commiphora mukul was administered in three doses 100, 200 and 400 mg kg(-1) p.o. for 30 days. On 29th and 30th day, the animals of isoprenaline control and Commiphora mukulpretreatment groups were administered isoprenaline (85 mg kg(-1); s.c.), consecutively at an interval of 24 hr. Isoprenaline administration produced a significant (p < 0.05) decrease in myocardial antioxidants; superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx), reduced glutathione (GSH), and myocyte injury marker enzymes creatine-phosphokinase-MB (CK-MB) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) along with enhanced lipid peroxidation; malondialdehyde (MDA) in heart. Commiphora mukul pretreatment reversed the isoprenaline-induced oxidative changes in rat myocardium by significant (p < 0.05) increase in SOD, CAT, GSHPx, GSH and reduction of MDA. In addition to improving myocardial antioxidant status, Commiphora mukul also prevented the leakage of LDH and CK-MB from heart. Further, histopathological examination showed the reduction of necrosis, edema and inflammation following Commiphora mukul pretreatment. Based on present findings, it is concluded that Commiphora mukul may be a potential preventive and therapeutic agent against the oxidative stress associated ischemic heart disease owing to antioxidant and antiperoxidative activity.

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    • "mukul) (synonym Commiphora whighitti) (family: Burseraceae) commonly called as gum guggulu is highly valued in Ayurveda an Indian system of medicine practiced in India, Bangladesh and Pakistan. The gum resin extract of C. mukul tree has been used in Ayurvedic medicine for more than 2 000 years to treat a variety of ailments like obesity, lipid disorders, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes [12] , bone fracture, cardiovascular disorder disease [13] . Traditional (India) uses of C. mukul are for its anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic, carminative, emmenagogue, hypoglycemic, alternative, antiseptic, and astringent, a thyroid stimulant, anthelminitic and antihyperlipidemia properties. "
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    ABSTRACT: To study the antioxidant efficacy of Commiphora mukul (C. mukul) gum resin ethanolic extract in streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rats. THE MALE WISTAR ALBINO RATS WERE RANDOMLY DIVIDED INTO FOUR GROUPS OF EIGHT ANIMALS EACH: Control group (C), CM-treated control group (C+CMEE), Diabetic control group (D), CM- treated diabetic group (D+CMEE). Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal injection of STZ (55 mg/kg/ bwt). After being confirmed the diabetic rats were treated with C. mukul gum resin ethanolic extract (CMEE) for 60 days. The biochemical estimations like antioxidant, oxidative stress marker enzymes and hepatic marker enzymes of tissues were performed. The diabetic rats showed increased level of enzymatic activities aspartate aminotransaminase (AST), alanine aminotransaminase (ALT) in liver and kidney and oxidative markers like lipid peroxidation (LPO) and protein oxidation (PO) in pancreas and heart. Antioxidant enzyme activities were significantly decreased in the pancreas and heart compared to control group. Administration of CMEE (200 mg/kg bw) to diabetic rats for 60 days significantly reversed the above parameters towards normalcy. In conclusion, our data indicate the preventive role of C. mukul against STZ-induced diabetic oxidative stress; hence this plant could be used as an adjuvant therapy for the prevention and/or management of diabetes and aggravated antioxidant status.
    Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Biomedicine 11/2012; 2(11):895-900. DOI:10.1016/S2221-1691(12)60249-4
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    • "mukul) (synonym Commiphora whighitti) (family: Burseraceae) commonly called as gum guggulu is highly valued in Ayurveda an Indian system of medicine practiced in India, Bangladesh and Pakistan. The gum resin extract of C. mukul tree has been used in Ayurvedic medicine for more than 2 000 years to treat a variety of ailments like obesity, lipid disorders, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes [12] , bone fracture, cardiovascular disorder disease [13] . Traditional (India) uses of C. mukul are for its anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic, carminative, emmenagogue, hypoglycemic, alternative, antiseptic, and astringent, a thyroid stimulant, anthelminitic and antihyperlipidemia properties. "
  • Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Biomedicine 01/2012;