Article

Assessing the relevance of in vitro studies in nanotoxicology by examining correlations between in vitro and in vivo data.

Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14642, USA.
Toxicology (Impact Factor: 4.02). 04/2012; 297(1-3):1-9. DOI: 10.1016/j.tox.2012.03.006
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT There is an urgent need for in vitro screening assays to evaluate nanoparticle (NP) toxicity. However, the relevance of in vitro assays is still disputable. We administered doses of TiO(2) NPs of different sizes to alveolar epithelial cells in vitro and the same NPs by intratracheal instillation in rats in vivo to examine the correlation between in vitro and in vivo responses. The correlations were based on toxicity rankings of NPs after adopting NP surface area as dose metric, and response per unit surface area as response metric. Sizes of the anatase TiO(2) NPs ranged from 3 to 100 nm. A cell-free assay for measuring reactive oxygen species (ROS) was used, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, and protein oxidation induction were the in vitro cellular assays using a rat lung Type I epithelial cell line (R3/1) following 24 h incubation. The in vivo endpoint was number of PMNs in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) after exposure of rats to the NPs via intratracheal instillation. Slope analyses of the dose response curves shows that the in vivo and in vitro responses were well correlated. We conclude that using the approach of steepest slope analysis offers a superior method to correlate in vitro with in vivo results of NP toxicity and for ranking their toxic potency.

1 Bookmark
 · 
216 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: There is a great need for screening tools capable of rapidly assessing nanomaterial toxicity. One impediment to the development of reliable in vitro screening methods is the need for accurate measures of cellular dose. We present here a methodology that enables accurate determination of delivered to cell dose metrics. This methodology includes (1) standardization of engineered nanomaterial (ENM) suspension preparation; (2) measurement of ENM characteristics controlling delivery to cells in culture; and (3) calculation of delivered dose as a function of exposure time using the ISDD model. The approach is validated against experimentally measured doses, and simplified analytical expressions for the delivered dose (Relevant In Vitro Dose (RID)f function) are derived for 20 ENMs. These functions can be used by nanotoxicologists to accurately calculate the total mass (RIDM), surface area (RIDSA), or particle number (RIDN) delivered to cells as a function of exposure time.
    Particle and Fibre Toxicology 05/2014; · 9.18 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The need for accurate in vitro dosimetry remains a major obstacle to the development of cost-effective toxicological screening methods for engineered nanomaterials. An important key to accurate in vitro dosimetry is the characterization of sedimentation and diffusion rates of nanoparticles suspended in culture media, which largely depend upon the effective density and diameter of formed agglomerates in suspension. Here we present a rapid and inexpensive method for accurately measuring the effective density of nano-agglomerates in suspension. This novel method is based on the volume of the pellet obtained by benchtop centrifugation of nanomaterial suspensions in a packed cell volume tube, and is validated against gold-standard analytical ultracentrifugation data. This simple and cost-effective method allows nanotoxicologists to correctly model nanoparticle transport, and thus attain accurate dosimetry in cell culture systems, which will greatly advance the development of reliable and efficient methods for toxicological testing and investigation of nano-bio interactions in vitro.
    Nature Communications 01/2014; 5:3514. · 10.02 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The nanotechnology offers some exciting possibilities in cancer treatment, including the possibility of destroying tumors with minimal damage to healthy tissue and organs by targeted drug delivery systems. Considerable achievements in investigations aimed at the use of ZnO nanoparticles and nanocontainers in diagnostics and antitumor therapy were described. However, there are substantial obstacles to the purposes to be achieved by the use of zinc oxide nanosize materials in antitumor therapy. Among the serious problems are the techniques of obtaining ZnO nanosize materials. The article presents a new vector delivery system for the known antitumor drug, doxorubicin in the form of polymeric (PEO, starch-NaCMC) hydrogels, in which nanosize ZnO film of a certain thickness are deposited directly on the drug surface on glass substrate by DC magnetron sputtering of a zinc target. Anticancer activity in vitro and in vivo of those nanosize zinc oxide composites is shown.
    05/2014;