Article

Vaccine-derived NSP2 segment in rotaviruses from vaccinated children with gastroenteritis in Nicaragua

Department of Microbiology, University of León, UNAN-León, Nicaragua.
Infection, genetics and evolution: journal of molecular epidemiology and evolutionary genetics in infectious diseases (Impact Factor: 3.26). 04/2012; 12(6):1282-94. DOI: 10.1016/j.meegid.2012.03.007
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Rotavirus (RV) vaccination programs have been established in several countries using the human-attenuated G1P[8] monovalent vaccine Rotarix (GlaxoSmithKline) and/or the human-bovine reassortant G1, G2, G3, G4, P[8] pentavalent vaccine RotaTeq (Merck). The efficacy of both vaccines is high (∼90%) in developed countries, but can be remarkably lower in developing countries. For example, a vaccine efficacy against severe diarrhea of only 58% was observed in a 2007-2009 Nicaraguan study using RotaTeq. To gain insight into the significant level of vaccine failure in this country, we sequenced the genomes of RVs recovered from vaccinated Nicaraguan children with gastroenteritis. The results revealed that all had genotype specificities typical for human RVs (11 G1P[8], 1 G3P[8]) and that the sequences and antigenic epitopes of the outer capsid proteins (VP4 and VP7) of these viruses were similar to those reported for RVs isolated elsewhere in the world. As expected, nine of the G1P[8] viruses and the single G3P[8] virus had genome constellations typical of human G1P[8] and G3P[8] RVs: G1/3-P[8]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T1-E1-H1. However, two of the G1P[8] viruses had atypical constellations, G1-P[8]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N2-T1-E1-H1, due to the presence of a genotype-2 NSP2 (N2) gene. The sequence of the N2 NSP2 gene was identical to the bovine N2 NSP2 gene of RotaTeq, indicating that the two atypical viruses originated via reassortment of human G1P[8] RVs with RotaTeq viruses. Together, our data suggest that the high level of vaccine failure in Nicaraguan is probably not due to antigenic drift of commonly circulating virus strains nor the emergence of new antigenetically distinct virus strains. Furthermore, our data suggest that the widespread use of the RotaTeq vaccine has led to the introduction of vaccine genes into circulating human RVs.

Download full-text

Full-text

Available from: Filemon Bucardo, Jul 01, 2015
0 Followers
 · 
193 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Group A rotaviruses (RVAs) are the leading cause of severe gastroenteritis and eventually death among infants and young children worldwide, and disease prevention and management through vaccination is a public health priority. In August 2009, Rotarix™ was introduced in the South African Expanded Programme on Immunisation. As a result, substantial reductions in RVA disease burden have been reported among children younger than 5 years old. Rotavirus strain surveillance post-vaccination is crucial to, inter alia, monitor and study the evolution of vaccine escape strains. Here, full-genome sequence data for the 11 gene segments from 11 South African G1P[8] rotavirus strains were generated, including 5 strains collected from non-vaccinated children during the 2004-2009 rotavirus seasons and 6 strains collected from vaccinated children during the 2010 rotavirus season. These data were analyzed to gain insights into the overall genetic makeup and evolution of South African G1P[8] rotavirus strains and to compare their genetic backbones with those of common human Wa-like RVAs from other countries, as well as with the Rotarix™ and RotaTeq™ G1P[8] vaccine components. All 11 South African G1P[8] strains revealed a complete Wa-like genotype constellation of G1-P[8]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T1-E1-H1. On the basis of sequence similarities, the South African G1P[8] strains (with the exception of strain RVA/Human-wt/ZAF/1262/2004/G1P[8]) were closely related to each other (96-100% identity in all gene segments). Comparison to the Rotarix™ and RotaTeq™ G1P[8] vaccine components revealed a moderate nucleotide identity of 89-96% and 93-95%, respectively. The results indicated that none of the gene segments of these 11 South African G1P[8] strains were vaccine-derived. This study illustrates that large-scale next generation sequencing will provide crucial information on the influence of the vaccination program on evolution of rotavirus strains. This is the first report to describe full genomic analyses of G1P[8] RVA strains collected from both non-vaccinated and vaccinated children in South Africa. J. Med. Virol. 9999: XX-XX, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Journal of Medical Virology 01/2015; 87(1). DOI:10.1002/jmv.23971 · 2.22 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Since 2004, the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) has carried out rotavirus surveillance in Latin America and the Caribbean. Here we report the characterization of human rotavirus with the novel G-P combination of G4P[14], detected through PAHO surveillance in Barbados. Full genome sequencing of strain RVA/Human-wt/BRB/CDC1133/2012/G4P[14] revealed that its genotype is G4-P[14]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A8-N1-T1-E1-H1. The possession of a Genogroup 1 (Wa-like) backbone distinguishes this strain from other P[14] rotavirus strains. Phylogenetic analyses suggested that this strain was likely generated by genetic reassortment between human, porcine and possibly other animal rotavirus strains and identified 7 lineages within the P[14] genotype. The results of this study reinforce the potential role of interspecies transmission in generating human rotavirus diversity through reassortment. Continued surveillance is important to determine if rotavirus vaccines will protect against strains that express the P[14] rotavirus genotype.
    Infection, genetics and evolution: journal of molecular epidemiology and evolutionary genetics in infectious diseases 09/2014; 28. DOI:10.1016/j.meegid.2014.09.020 · 3.26 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Rotaviruses (RVs) are a large genetically diverse population of segmented double-stranded (ds) RNA viruses that are important causes of gastroenteritis in many animal species. The human RVs are responsible for the deaths of nearly 450,000 infants and young children each year, most occurring in developing countries. Recent large-scale sequencing efforts have revealed that the genomes of human RVs typically consist of phylogenetically linked constellations of eleven dsRNA segments. The presence of such preferred constellations indicate that the human RV genes have co-evolved to produce protein sets that work optimally together to support virus replication. Two of the viral genes encode virion outer capsid proteins (VP7 and VP4) whose antigenic properties define the G/P type of the virus. From year-to-year and place-to-place, the G/P type of human RVs associated with disease can fluctuate dramatically, phenomena that can be associated with the presence and behavior of genetically distinct RV clades. The recent introduction of two live attenuated RV vaccines [RotaTeq (TM) and Rotarix (TM)] into the childhood vaccination programs of various countries has been highly effective in reducing the incidence of RV diarrheal disease. Whether the widespread use of these vaccines will introduce selective pressures on human RVs, triggering genetic and antigenic changes that undermine the effectiveness of vaccinations programs, is uncertain and will require continued surveillance of human RVs.
    Discovery medicine 01/2012; 13(68):85-97. · 3.50 Impact Factor