Article

Dermoscopic criteria and basal cell carcinoma.

Melanoma Unit, Dermatology Department, Barcelona Clinical Hospital, IDIBAPS, Barcelona, Spain.
Giornale Italiano di Dermatologia e Venereologia (Impact Factor: 0.49). 04/2012; 147(2):135-40.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most frequent of all skin cancers in the white population. Dermoscopy is a method that improves diagnosis in pigmented and non-pigmented skin lesions, allowing early diagnosis, especially of incipient lesions. The classical dermoscopy algorithm for the diagnosis of BCC includes lack of pigment network and the presence of at least one of the following criteria: ulceration, maple-leaf like structure, blue-gray globules, blue-ovoid nests, arborizing vessels and spoke-wheel structures. The non-classical dermoscopic features of BCC include some criteria more frequently seen in superficial BCC such as pink-white areas, concentric structures, multiple erosions, multiple in-focus blue-gray dots and fine vessels. Recently, the dermoscopy of Fibroepithelioma of Pinkus has also been described with the presence of fine arborizing vessels, white streaks and gray-brown structureless areas. Some dermoscopic structures also present in BCC are just visible with polarized dermoscopy such as white shiny streaks or Chrysalides and Rosetas. Improved knowledge of all these criteria may avoid some diagnostic pitfalls and improve the early recognition of BCCs.

4 Bookmarks
 · 
405 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Dermoscopy is a complementary technique that has led to major advances in the diagnosis of pigmented skin lesions. The aim of this study was to describe the dermoscopic features of a series of melanomas and analyze the differences between melanomas in situ and invasive melanomas. We retrospectively recorded epidemiological, clinical, histologic, and dermoscopic features of a series of 200 primary melanomas. We performed a descriptive and analytical study of the dermoscopic features identified. The mean age of the patients was 63 years and there was a similar distribution of male and female patients. The most common histologic subtypes were superficial spreading melanoma (62.5%) and lentigo maligna (25.5%); 67% of the melanomas had a Breslow thickness of less than 1mm and 24.5% were melanomas in situ. Overall,the most common global dermoscopic features were the multicomponent pattern (33.5%), the reticular pattern (18%), and the nonspecific pattern (15.5%). The most common local features were structureless homogeneous areas (67.5%), white-blue structures (58%), an atypical pigmented network (55.5%), and irregularly distributed dots and globules (44%). The following features were more common in invasive melanomas than in melanomas in situ: blue, gray, red and white colors, multicomponent and homogeneous patterns, dots and globules, blue-white structures, homogeneous areas, a blue-white veil, white shiny structures, a reverse pigment network, and milky-red areas. The reticular pattern was more common in melanomas in situ. The use of dermoscopy has contributed to the early diagnosis of melanoma. The most common dermoscopic features of melanoma are multiple structures and colors (multicomponent pattern), an atypical reticular pattern (with wide, irregular meshes), and an absence of distinguishing features (nonspecific pattern) associated with the presence of vascular structures. Dermoscopy facilitates the diagnosis of melanoma and could be useful for differentiating between melanoma in situ and invasive melanoma.
    Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas 04/2014;
  • Source
    Prevention and Research. 01/2013; 3(2):152-62.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Introduction Dermoscopy is a complementary technique that has led to major advances in the diagnosis of pigmented skin lesions. The aim of this study was to describe the dermoscopic features of a series of melanomas and analyze the differences between melanomas in situ and invasive melanomas. Material and methods We retrospectively recorded epidemiological, clinical, histologic, and dermoscopic features of a series of 200 primary melanomas. We performed a descriptive and analytical study of the dermoscopic features identified. Results The mean age of the patients was 63 years and there was a similar distribution of male and female patients. The most common histologic subtypes were superficial spreading melanoma (62.5%) and lentigo maligna (25.5%); 67% of the melanomas had a Breslow thickness of less than 1 mm and 24.5% were melanomas in situ. Overall,the most common global dermoscopic features were the multicomponent pattern (33.5%), the reticular pattern (18%), and the nonspecific pattern (15.5%). The most common local features were structureless homogeneous areas (67.5%), white-blue structures (58%), an atypical pigmented network (55.5%), and irregularly distributed dots and globules (44%). The following features were more common in invasive melanomas than in melanomas in situ: blue, gray, red and white colors, multicomponent and homogeneous patterns, dots and globules, blue-white structures, homogeneous areas, a blue-white veil, white shiny structures, a reverse pigment network, and milky-red areas. The reticular pattern was more common in melanomas in situ. Discussion The use of dermoscopy has contributed to the early diagnosis of melanoma. The most common dermoscopic features of melanoma are multiple structures and colors (multicomponent pattern), an atypical reticular pattern (with wide, irregular meshes), and an absence of distinguishing features (nonspecific pattern) associated with the presence of vascular structures. Conclusions Dermoscopy facilitates the diagnosis of melanoma and could be useful for differentiating between melanoma in situ and invasive melanoma.
    Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas 01/2014;

Full-text

Download
421 Downloads
Available from
May 19, 2014