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Mass spectrometric U-series dating of Laibin hominid site in Guangxi, southern China

College of Geographical Sciences, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210046, PR China; Natural History Museum of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, Nanning 530012, PR China; Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
Journal of Archaeological Science 01/2007; DOI: 10.1016/j.jas.2007.02.008

ABSTRACT The Laibin hominid represents one of the rare finds of modern Homo sapiens in China, rare for its relative completeness and well-established stratigaphic provenance. This paper presents the results of mass spectrometric U-series dating of intercalated calcite samples from the Laibin site. The capping flowstone and the calcite vein, which sandwich the hominid fossil-containing deposits, date to 38.5 ± 1.0 and 44.0 ± 0.8 ka, setting respectively the minimum and maximum ages to the fossils. The second flowstone layer is 112.0 ± 1.4 ka old, indicating that the cultural sequence may possibly extend to somewhere between 44 and 112 ka. Securely dated Laibin finds should be of importance in reconstructing human physical and cultural evolution in the region.

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