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Engaging online learners: The impact of Web-based learning technology on college student engagement

Department of Counseling and Higher Education, University of North Texas, 1155 Union Circle #310829, Denton, TX 76203-5017, USA; Center for Postsecondary Research, Indiana University Bloomington, USA
Computers & Education 01/2010; DOI: 10.1016/j.compedu.2009.11.008
Source: DBLP

ABSTRACT Widespread use of the Web and other Internet technologies in postsecondary education has exploded in the last 15 years. Using a set of items developed by the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE), the researchers utilized the hierarchical linear model (HLM) and multiple regressions to investigate the impact of Web-based learning technology on student engagement and self-reported learning outcomes in face-to-face and online learning environments. The results show a general positive relationship between the use the learning technology and student engagement and learning outcomes. We also discuss the possible impact on minority and part-time students as they are more likely to enroll in online courses.

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