Article

Proposal for a spintronic femto-Tesla magnetic field sensor

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Commonwealth University, 601 W Main Street, Richmond, VA 23284, USA; Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Computer Science, University of Cincinnati, OH 45221, USA
Physica E Low-dimensional Systems and Nanostructures (Impact Factor: 1.86). 08/2004; DOI: 10.1016/j.physe.2004.10.012
Source: arXiv

ABSTRACT We propose a spintronic magnetic field sensor, fashioned out of quantum wires, which may be capable of detecting very weak magnetic fields with a sensitivity of ∼ at a temperature of 4.2 K, and ∼ at room temperature. Such sensors have commercial applications in magnetometry, quantum computing, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance, magneto-encephalography, and military applications in weapon detection.

0 Bookmarks
 · 
121 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We propose a spintronic strain/stress sensor capable of sensing strain with a sensitivity of ~10−13 Hz−1/2 at room temperature with an active sensing area of ~1 cm2 and power dissipation of ~1 W. This device measures stress or strain by monitoring the change in the spin-polarized current in a parallel array of free-standing nanowire spin valves when the array is subjected to compressive or tensile stress along the wires' length. Such a sensor can be fabricated using a variety of techniques involving nanolithography, self-assembly and epitaxial growth.
    Journal of Physics D Applied Physics 04/2011; 44(20):205301. · 2.53 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We propose a spintronic strain sensor capable of sensing strain with a sensitivity of 1E-13/sqrt{Hz} at room temperature with an active sensing area of 1 cmE2 and power dissipation of 1 watt. This device measures strain by monitoring the change in the spin-polarized current in a parallel array of free standing nanowire spin valves when the array is subjected to compressive or tensile stress along the wires' length. The change in the current is linearly proportional to the strain, which makes the sensor relatively distortion-free. Such a sensor can be fabricated using a variety of techniques involving nanolithography, self assembly and epitaxial growth.
    02/2010;
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Conductivity of In0.38Ga0.62As quantum wires grown on the (311)A plane of GaAs was studied using temperature dependent Hall effect. Detailed analysis of the scattering phenomena which control electron mobility along the wires indicates that the most significant scattering mechanism which limits electron mobility at low temperatures is scattering from interface roughness. This finding contributes to the general understanding of the potential to use self-assembled semiconductor quantum wires in the fabrication of thermoelectric devices where one-dimensionality and enhanced scattering at rough boundaries are important.
    Applied Physics Letters 01/2010; 97(26). · 3.79 Impact Factor

Full-text (2 Sources)

View
59 Downloads
Available from
May 20, 2014