Article

A software complexity model of object-oriented systems

The R.B. Pamplin College of Business, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061-0101, USA; Graduate School of Business, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0419, USA; Graduate School of Business, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0419, USA
Decision Support Systems 01/1995; DOI: 10.1016/0167-9236(93)E0045-F

ABSTRACT A model for the emerging area of software complexity measurement of OO systems is required for the integration of measures defined by various researchers and to provide a framework for continued investigation. We present a model, based in the literature of OO systems and software complexity for structured systems. The model defines the software complexity of OO systems at the variable, method, object, and system levels. At each level, measures are identified that account for the cohesion and coupling aspects of the system. Users of OO techniques perceptions of complexity provide support for the levels and measures.

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