Article

Transmission power and data rate aware routing on wireless networks

Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil; Federal University of Paraná, Brazil; Federal University of Lavras, Brazil; Laboratoire d’Informatique Paris VI (LIP6), Paris Universitas, France
Computer Networks 01/2010; DOI:10.1016/j.comnet.2010.05.009
Source: DBLP

ABSTRACT Wireless networks can vary both the transmission power and modulation of links. Existing routing protocols do not take transmission power control (TPC) and modulation adaptation (also known as rate adaptation – RA) into account at the same time, even though the performance of wireless networks can be significantly improved when routing algorithms use link characteristics to build their routes. This article proposes and evaluates extensions to routing protocols to cope with TPC and RA. The enhancements can be applied to any link state or distance vector routing protocols. An evaluation considering node density, node mobility and link error show that TPC- and RA-aware routing algorithms improve the average latency and the end-to-end throughput, while consuming less energy than traditional protocols.

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