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Radioactive concentrations of the Livingston Island soils (Antartica). Dosimetry considerations

Departamento de Física, Facultad de Veterinaria, Ctra. de Trujillo s/n, 10071 Cáceres, Spain; Instituto de Física Corpuscular, Centro Mixto Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, C/Dr. Moliner, no 50, 46010 Burjassot, Valencia, Spain
Applied Radiation and Isotopes 01/1994; DOI: 10.1016/0969-8043(94)90246-1

ABSTRACT The radioactive concentrations of natural and man-made (90Sr and 137Cs) emitters were studied in soil samples collected from an area of 2.3 km2 around the Spanish Antarstic Base on Livingston Island in the South Shetlands.The levels of radiation detected, for natural radioisotopes, as well as consequently the measured levels of effective dose equivalent rate, are of the order of half the values commonly assigned as world averages for these magnitudes.

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