Article

Violence against transgender people: A review of United States data

University of Hawai’i at Mānoa, United States
Aggression and Violent Behavior (Impact Factor: 1.95). 05/2009; DOI: 10.1016/j.avb.2009.01.006

ABSTRACT Transgender people face many challenges in a society that is unforgiving of any system of gender that is not binary. However, there are three primary sources of data in the United States for discerning the rates and types of violence that transgender people face throughout their lives — self-report surveys and needs assessments, hot-line call and social service records, and police reports. Data from each of these sources are discussed in length, as well as some of the methodological issues for these types of data sources. All three sources indicate that violence against transgender people starts early in life, that transgender people are at risk for multiple types and incidences of violence, and that this threat lasts throughout their lives. In addition, transgender people seem to have particularly high risk for sexual violence. Future research considerations, such as improving data collection efforts, are discussed.

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Available from: Rebecca L. Stotzer, May 29, 2015
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