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Studies examine fetal surgery trade-offs, drug interactions, and uterine rupture.

JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association (Impact Factor: 30.39). 03/2012; 307(12):1239-41. DOI: 10.1001/jama.2012.315
Source: PubMed
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