Article

Small Molecules and Big Killers: The Challenge of Eliminating the Latent HIV Reservoir

HIV-Specific Immunity Section, Laboratory of Immunoregulation, NIAID/NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.
Immunity (Impact Factor: 19.75). 03/2012; 36(3):320-1. DOI: 10.1016/j.immuni.2012.03.006
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT In this issue of Immunity, Shan et al. (2012) explore the elimination of cells latently infected with HIV and the potential implications for strategies to eradicate the virus from infected patients.

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