Article

What We Don't Talk about When We Don't Talk about Sex: Results of a National Survey of US Obstetrician/Gynecologists

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, USA.
Journal of Sexual Medicine (Impact Factor: 3.15). 03/2012; 9(5):1285-94. DOI: 10.1111/j.1743-6109.2012.02702.x
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Sexuality is a key aspect of women's physical and psychological health. Research shows both patients and physicians face barriers to communication about sexuality. Given their expertise and training in addressing conditions of the female genital tract across the female life course, obstetrician/gynecologists (ob/gyns) are well positioned among all physicians to address sexuality issues with female patients. New practice guidelines for management of female sexual dysfunction and the importance of female sexual behavior and function to virtually all aspects of ob/gyn care, and to women's health more broadly, warrant up-to-date information regarding ob/gyns' sexual-history-taking routine.
To determine ob/gyns' practices of communication with patients about sexuality, and to examine the individual and practice-level correlates of such communication.
A population-based sample of 1,154 practicing U.S. ob/gyns (53% male; mean age 48 years) was surveyed regarding their practices of communication with patients about sex.
Self-reported frequency measures of ob/gyns' communication practices with patients including whether or not ob/gyns discuss patients' sexual activities, sexual orientation, satisfaction with sexual life, pleasure with sexual activity, and sexual problems or dysfunction, as well as whether or not one ever expresses disapproval of or disagreement with patients' sexual practices. Multivariable analysis was used to correlate physicians' personal and practice characteristics with these communication practices.
Survey response rate was 65.6%. Sixty-three percent of ob/gyns reported routinely assessing patients' sexual activities; 40% routinely asked about sexual problems. Fewer asked about sexual satisfaction (28.5%), sexual orientation/identity (27.7%), or pleasure with sexual activity (13.8%). A quarter of ob/gyns reported they had expressed disapproval of patients' sexual practices. Ob/gyns practicing predominately gynecology were significantly more likely than other ob/gyns to routinely ask about each of the five outcomes investigated.
The majority of U.S. ob/gyns report routinely asking patients about their sexual activities, but most other areas of patients' sexuality are not routinely discussed.

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