Article

Guidelines for Preventing and Treating Vitamin D Deficiency and Insufficiency Revisited

Boston University Medical Center, School of Medicine, 715 Albany Street, M 1013, Boston, Massachusetts 2118, USA.
The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism (Impact Factor: 6.31). 03/2012; 97(4):1153-8. DOI: 10.1210/jc.2011-2601
Source: PubMed

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Available from: David A Hanley, Apr 07, 2015
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